coronavirus generic

According to the VDH's latest daily report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 11), Virginia added 776 new positive cases of COVID-19 since yesterday, more than 200 fewer than Tuesday, when 996 cases were added. On Monday, the state reported 663 new cases; that was the lowest number of new cases since July 9, when the state registered 616 new cases.

New cases have topped 1,000 ten times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. A surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 102,521 (4,147 probable).

In Fauquier, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 623, the same as yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases. So far in August, Fauquier has logged 52 new cases.

Fauquier County showed one new death Aug. 5, bringing the total number of COVID-19 fatalities to 9. Before that, the county had not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7.

County hospitalizations rose by one on Aug. 7, to 35; before that, there had not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

The Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District of the Virginia Department of Health reported a new outbreak of COVID-19 on Aug. 6, its first in an educational setting. The outbreak designation came as a result of three confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Bradley Elementary School in Warrenton.

Before this most recent outbreak, the RRHD’s last outbreak was reported on July 21, its fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with 10 cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic. In total, 155 COVID-19 cases have been attributed to the 11 outbreaks in the RRHD.

State-wide, there have been 338 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,554 cases and 1,282 deaths), 241 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 49 in correctional facilities, 50 in health care settings, 37 in educational settings.

Hospitalizations in the state

According to the VDH, total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,532 (52 probable), 74 more than yesterday. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were logged.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,281 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 12 fewer than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 884 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 397 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 13,247 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,532.

According to VDH data, 8 new deaths were reported in the state as of Wednesday morning, after 17 were reported yesterday. 2,352 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (114 probable). On Saturday, Aug. 1, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded. (Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.3% for the state as of Wednesday’s report. It has been hovering between 7% and 7.6% since July 11. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%; on April 21, it was at its highest, 20.1%

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity average was 1.7% on July 1. It has risen and fallen and risen again since then. Yesterday it was 6.0%; today it is 5.8%. At its highest, the positivity rate for RRHD was 23.4% on May 8.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

The long view

The Virginia Department of Health releases a summary of the state’s COVID-19 response every Friday. On Aug. 7 the key takeaways were:

  • 14 health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • Surges in Arlington, Pittsylvania-Danville and Rappahannock-Rapidan have abated.
  • New surges (re)emerged in Three Rivers, Piedmont, Prince William, Alleghany, Roanoke and Henrico.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have almost 7,200 weekly confirmed cases by late August.
  • The state-wide reproduction rate remains below 1.0.

The report further states, “... States which lifted public health restrictions early tended to see a spike in new case growth rates about 4 weeks later, resulting in a surge in new confirmed cases. However, like most things COVID-19 related, we knew little about these surges, particularly how they would affect Virginia.

“Fortunately, we are learning more every day... Based on very limited data, it appears that the growth rate during surges is about half of the rate before stay at home orders were put in place.... As we have already seen, Virginia did not avoid surges, but they are occurring regionally, mostly affecting the Hampton Roads region so far.

“… Finally, some foreseen events, including schools and universities reopening and the beginning of autumn weather, are likely to influence the spread of COVID-19. But how, at this point, remains uncertain.”

TUESDAY, AUG. 11: According to the VDH's latest daily report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 10), Virginia added 996 new positive cases of COVID-19 since yesterday. On Monday, the state reported 663 new cases; that was the lowest number of new cases since July 9, when the state registered 616 new cases.

New cases have topped 1,000 ten times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. A surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 101.745 (4,033 probable).

In Fauquier, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 623, three more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier County showed one new death Aug. 5, bringing the total number of COVID-19 fatalities to 9. Before that, the county had not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7.

County hospitalizations rose by one on Aug. 7, to 35; before that, there had not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April. So far in August, there have been 50 new cases in Fauquier.

The Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District of the Virginia Department of Health reported a new outbreak of COVID-19 on Aug. 6, its first in an educational setting. The outbreak designation came as a result of three confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Bradley Elementary School in Warrenton.

Before this most recent outbreak, the RRHD’s last outbreak was reported on July 21, its fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with 10 cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic. In total, 155 COVID-19 cases have been attributed to the 11 outbreaks in the RRHD.

State-wide, there have been 335 outbreaks in long term care settings, seven more than yesterday (resulting in 8,505 cases and 1,280 deaths), 239 outbreaks in congregate care settings (10 more than yesterday), 49 in correctional facilities, 50 in health care settings, 35 in educational settings.

Hospitalizations in the state

According to the VDH, total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,458 (51 probable), 67 more than yesterday. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were logged.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,293 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 42 more than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 866 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 427 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 13,152 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,458.

According to VDH data, 17 new deaths were reported in the state as of Tuesday morning. 2,344 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (112 probable). On Saturday, Aug. 1, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded. (Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.5% for the state as of Monday’s report. It has been hovering between 7% and 7.6% since July 11. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%; on April 21, it was at its highest, 20.1%

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity average was 1.7% on July 1. It has risen and fallen and risen again since then. Sunday it was 5.7%; today it is 6%. At its highest, the positivity rate for RRHD was 23.4% on May 8.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

The long view

The Virginia Department of Health releases a summary of the state’s COVID-19 response every Friday. On Aug. 7 the key takeaways were:

  • 14 health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • Surges in Arlington, Pittsylvania-Danville and Rappahannock-Rapidan have abated.
  • New surges (re)emerged in Three Rivers, Piedmont, Prince William, Alleghany, Roanoke and Henrico.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have almost 7,200 weekly confirmed cases by late August.
  • The state-wide reproduction rate remains below 1.0.

The report further states, “... States which lifted public health restrictions early tended to see a spike in new case growth rates about 4 weeks later, resulting in a surge in new confirmed cases. However, like most things COVID-19 related, we knew little about these surges, particularly how they would affect Virginia.

“Fortunately, we are learning more every day... Based on very limited data, it appears that the growth rate during surges is about half of the rate before stay at home orders were put in place.... As we have already seen, Virginia did not avoid surges, but they are occurring regionally, mostly affecting the Hampton Roads region so far.

“… Finally, some foreseen events, including schools and universities reopening and the beginning of autumn weather, are likely to influence the spread of COVID-19. But how, at this point, remains uncertain.”

MONDAY, AUG. 10: According to the VDH's latest daily report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 9), Virginia added 663 new positive cases of COVID-19 since yesterday; that is the lowest number of new cases since July 9, when the state registered 616 new cases. 897 were added on Sunday, 1,307 on Saturday.

caes numbers 081020

Note: The case numbers for Aug. 7 were artificially inflated because of a delay in reporting.

New cases have topped 1,000 ten times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. A surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 100,749 (3,942 probable).

In Fauquier, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 620, 4 more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier County showed one new death Aug. 5, bringing the total number of COVID-19 fatalities to 9. Before that, the county had not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7.

County hospitalizations rose by one on Aug. 7, to 35; before that, there had not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

The Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District of the Virginia Department of Health reported a new outbreak of COVID-19 on Aug. 6, its first in an educational setting. The outbreak designation came as a result of three confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Bradley Elementary School in Warrenton.

Before this most recent outbreak, the RRHD’s last outbreak was reported on July 21, its fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with 10 cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic. In total, 155 COVID-19 cases have been attributed to the 11 outbreaks in the RRHD.

State-wide, there have been 328 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,414 cases and 1,274 deaths), 229 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 49 in health care settings, 33 in educational settings.

Hospitalizations in the state

According to the VDH, total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,391 (50 probable), 22 more than yesterday. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were logged.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,251 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 51 more than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 855 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 396 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,961 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,391.

According to VDH data, only one new death was reported in the state as of Monday morning. 2,327 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (112 probable). On Saturday, Aug. 1, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded. (Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.4% for the state as of Monday’s report. It has been hovering between 7% and 7.6% since July 11. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%; on April 21, it was at its highest, 20.1%

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity average was 1.7% on July 1. It has risen and fallen and risen again since then. Yesterday it was 5.7%; today it is 6%. At its highest, the positivity rate for RRHD was 23.4% on May 8.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

The long view

The Virginia Department of Health releases a summary of the state’s COVID-19 response every Friday. On Aug. 7 the key takeaways were:

  • 14 health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • Surges in Arlington, Pittsylvania-Danville and Rappahannock-Rapidan have abated.
  • New surges (re)emerged in Three Rivers, Piedmont, Prince William, Alleghany, Roanoke and Henrico.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have almost 7,200 weekly confirmed cases by late August.
  • The state-wide reproduction rate remains below 1.0.

The report further states, “... States which lifted public health restrictions early tended to see a spike in new case growth rates about 4 weeks later, resulting in a surge in new confirmed cases. However, like most things COVID-19 related, we knew little about these surges, particularly how they would affect Virginia.

“Fortunately, we are learning more every day... Based on very limited data, it appears that the growth rate during surges is about half of the rate before stay at home orders were put in place.... As we have already seen, Virginia did not avoid surges, but they are occurring regionally, mostly affecting the Hampton Roads region so far.

“… Finally, some foreseen events, including schools and universities reopening and the beginning of autumn weather, are likely to influence the spread of COVID-19. But how, at this point, remains uncertain.”

SUNDAY, AUG. 9: The Virginia Department of Health releases a summary of the state’s COVID-19 response every Friday. On Aug. 7 the key takeaways were:

  • 14 health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • Surges in Arlington, Pittsylvania-Danville and Rappahannock-Rapidan have abated.
  • New surges (re)emerged in Three Rivers, Piedmont, Prince William, Alleghany, Roanoke and Henrico.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have almost 7,200 weekly confirmed cases by late August.
  • The state-wide reproduction rate remains below 1.0.

The report further states, “... States which lifted public health restrictions early tended to see a spike in new case growth rates about 4 weeks later, resulting in a surge in new confirmed cases. However, like most things COVID-19 related, we knew little about these surges, particularly how they would affect Virginia.

“Fortunately, we are learning more every day... Based on very limited data, it appears that the growth rate during surges is about half of the rate before stay at home orders were put in place.... As we have already seen, Virginia did not avoid surges, but they are occurring regionally, mostly affecting the Hampton Roads region so far.

“… Finally, some foreseen events, including schools and universities reopening and the beginning of autumn weather, are likely to influence the spread of COVID-19. But how, at this point, remains uncertain.”

Daily data

According to the VDH's latest daily report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 8), Virginia added 897 new positive cases of COVID-19 since yesterday. 1,307 new cases were added on Saturday; 818 new cases of COVID-19 were added Thursday morning and 798 cases on Wednesday, which was the lowest number of new cases since July 9, when 613 were added.

New cases have topped 1,000 ten times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 100,086 (3,919 probable).

In Fauquier, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 616, 2 more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier County showed one new death Aug. 5, bringing the total number of COVID-19 fatalities to 9. Before that, the county had not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7.

County hospitalizations rose by one on Aug. 7, to 35; before that, there had not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

The Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District of the Virginia Department of Health reported a new outbreak of COVID-19 on Aug. 6, its first in an educational setting. The outbreak designation came as a result of three confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Bradley Elementary School in Warrenton.

No new outbreak was announced after the first two cases were confirmed. On Aug. 1, RRHD Health Director Dr. Wade Kartchner explained why that situation did not qualify as an outbreak: “In defining an outbreak, in addition to numbers, we need to ascertain whether or not transmission is occurring at a given location between people. Because if community transmission is occurring, the likelihood of two people testing positive and who just happen to work in the same place is fairly high. In this instance, our investigation leads us to believe that is the case, and we haven't seen any further transmission at that particular workplace. Subsequent tests on others have been negative,” he said.

However, after the outbreak in an educational setting was announced Aug. 6, Kartchner said, “Another person tested positive who works at the school.”

Fauquier County Public Schools spokeswoman Tara Helkowski said after last week’s report of two confirmed cases, “FCPS has an established protocol to work with the local health department to manage COVID-19 cases. We continue to follow all procedures established by the [Virginia Department of Health] and the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]. Once we were made aware of the first case on July 27, we contacted the VDH, worked with the Fauquier County Employee Wellness Center, and notified anyone who was potentially exposed.”

Before this most recent outbreak, the RRHD’s last outbreak was reported on July 21, its fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with 10 cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 328 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,411 cases and 1,274 deaths), 228 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 49 in health care settings, 33 in educational settings.

Hospitalizations in the state

According to the VDH, total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,369 (50 probable), 37 more than yesterday. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were logged.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,200 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 172 fewer than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 856 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 344 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,923 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,369.

According to VDH data, 4 new deaths were reported in the state Sunday morning. 2,326 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (112 probable). On Saturday, Aug. 1, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded. (Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.6% for the state as of Sunday’s report, the highest it’s been since July 19. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%; on April 21, it was at its highest, 20.1%

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity average was 1.7% on July 1. It has risen and fallen and risen again since then. Yesterday it was 5.1%; today it is 5.7%. At its highest, the positivity rate for RRHD was 23.4% on May 8.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

SATURDAY, AUG. 8: The Virginia Department of Health releases a summary of the state’s COVID-19 response every Friday. On Aug. 7 the key takeaways were:

  • 14 health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • Surges in Arlington, Pittsylvania-Danville and Rappahannock-Rapidan have abated. New surges (re)emerged in Three Rivers, Piedmont, Prince William, Alleghany, Roanoke and Henrico.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have almost 7,200 weekly confirmed cases by late August.
  • The state-wide reproduction rate remains below 1.0.
RRHD growth rate model 080820

This chart reflects the predicted growth rate of COVID-19 in the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District through the end of August.

The report further states, “... States which lifted public health restrictions early tended to see a spike in new case growth rates about 4 weeks later, resulting in a surge in new confirmed cases. However, like most things COVID-19 related, we knew little about these surges, particularly how they would affect Virginia.

“How strong would surges be? Would surges spread uniformly across the state, or regionally? Would the phased approach in the Forward Virginia plan result in lighter surges, or avoid surges entirely? How long would they last?

“Fortunately, we are learning more every day... Based on very limited data, it appears that the growth rate during surges is about half of the rate before stay at home orders were put in place.... As we have already seen, Virginia did not avoid surges, but they are occurring regionally, mostly affecting the Hampton Roads region so far.”

“… Finally, some foreseen events, including schools and universities reopening and the beginning of autumn weather, are likely to influence the spread of COVID-19. But how, at this point, remains uncertain.”

Daily data

According to the VDH's latest daily report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 7), Virginia added 1,307 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday. 818 new cases of COVID-19 were added Thursday morning and 798 cases on Wednesday, which was the lowest number of new cases since July 9, when 613 were added.

New cases have topped 1,000 ten times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 99,189 (3,863 probable).

In Fauquier, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 614, 8 more than yesterday; Fauquier added 14 new cases Friday. July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier County showed one new death in Wednesday’s COVID-19 data provided by the VDH. Before Aug. 5, the county had not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7. Fauquier has logged a total of nine deaths since April 9.

County hospitalizations rose by one Friday, to 35; before Aug. 7, there had not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

The Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District of the Virginia Department of Health reported a new outbreak of COVID-19 Thursday morning, its first in an educational setting. The outbreak designation came as a result of three confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Bradley Elementary School in Warrenton.

No new outbreak was announced after the first two cases were confirmed. On Aug. 1, RRHD Health Director Wade Kartchner explained why that situation did not qualify as an outbreak: “In defining an outbreak, in addition to numbers, we need to ascertain whether or not transmission is occurring at a given location between people. Because if community transmission is occurring, the likelihood of two people testing positive and who just happen to work in the same place is fairly high. In this instance, our investigation leads us to believe that is the case, and we haven't seen any further transmission at that particular workplace. Subsequent tests on others have been negative,” he said.

However, after the outbreak in an educational setting was announced Aug. 6, Kartchner said, “Another person tested positive who works at the school.”

Fauquier County Public Schools spokeswoman Tara Helkowski said after last week’s report of two confirmed cases, “FCPS has an established protocol to work with the local health department to manage COVID-19 cases. We continue to follow all procedures established by the [Virginia Department of Health] and the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]. Once we were made aware of the first case on July 27, we contacted the VDH, worked with the Fauquier County Employee Wellness Center, and notified anyone who was potentially exposed.”

Before this most recent outbreak, the RRHD’s last outbreak was reported on July 21, its fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with 10 cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 328 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,387 cases and 1,274 deaths), 228 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 49 in health care settings, 32 in educational settings.

Hospitalizations in the state

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,332 (50 probable), 51 more than yesterday. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,372 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 114 fewer than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 896 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 362 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,843 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,332.

According to VDH data, 5 new deaths were been reported in the state Saturday morning. 2,322 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (111 probable). On Saturday, Aug. 1, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded. (Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

positivity rate 080820

This chart shows the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District's 7-day positivity average.

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.5% for the state as of Saturday’s report, the highest it’s been since July 20. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%; on April 21, it was at its highest, 20.1%

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It has risen and fallen and risen again since then; today it is 5.1%. At its highest, the positivity rate for RRHD was 23.4% on May 8.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

FRIDAY, AUG. 7: According to the Virginia Department of Health's latest report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 6), Virginia added 2,015 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, for the greatest one-day jump ever in the commonwealth. (See box on this page for explanation from the VDH). 818 new cases of COVID-19 were added Thursday morning and 798 cases on Wednesday, which was the lowest number of new cases since July 9, when 613 were added. The state added 1,145 Tuesday and 1,324 Monday.

New cases have topped 1,000 nine times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 97,882 (3,741 probable).

In Fauquier, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 606, 14 more than yesterday; that is the sixth-highest one-day jump since the start of the pandemic. Four were added Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, and six on Monday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier County showed one new death in Wednesday’s COVID-19 data provided by the VDH. Before Wednesday, the county had not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7. Fauquier has logged a total of nine deaths since April 9. Demographic data for the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District shows that the most recent fatality was a woman between 60 and 69 years old.

County hospitalizations also rose by one Friday, to 35; before today, there had not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

The Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District of the Virginia Department of Health reported a new outbreak of COVID-19 yesterday morning, its first in an educational setting. The outbreak designation comes as a result of three confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Bradley Elementary School in Warrenton. In Friday’s report, there were no new outbreak-related cases in the health district since yesterday.

No new outbreak was announced after the first two cases were confirmed. On Aug. 1, RRHD Health Director Wade Kartchner explained why that situation did not qualify as an outbreak: “In defining an outbreak, in addition to numbers, we need to ascertain whether or not transmission is occurring at a given location between people. Because if community transmission is occurring, the likelihood of two people testing positive and who just happen to work in the same place is fairly high. In this instance, our investigation leads us to believe that is the case, and we haven't seen any further transmission at that particular workplace. Subsequent tests on others have been negative,” he said.

However, after the outbreak in an educational setting was announced Thursday morning, Kartchner said, “Another person tested positive who works at the school.”

Fauquier County Public Schools spokeswoman Tara Helkowski said after last week’s report of two confirmed cases, “FCPS has an established protocol to work with the local health department to manage COVID-19 cases. We continue to follow all procedures established by the [Virginia Department of Health] and the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]. Once we were made aware of the first case on July 27, we contacted the VDH, worked with the Fauquier County Employee Wellness Center, and notified anyone who was potentially exposed.”

Before this most recent outbreak, the RRHD’s last outbreak was reported on July 21, its fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with 10 cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 326 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,355 cases and 1,274 deaths), 227 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 49 in health care settings, 31 in educational settings.

Hospitalizations in the state

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,281 (50 probable), 98 more than yesterday. That is the highest number of new hospitalizations since July 16, when there were 115. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,372 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 23 more than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 897 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 475 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,725 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,281.

According to VDH data, 18 new deaths have been reported in the state as of Friday. 2,317 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (109 probable). On Saturday,  Aug. 1, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded. (Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.3% for the state as of Friday’s report; it has been hovering around that number since July 26. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14; today it is 4.5%.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

THURSDAY, AUG. 6: The Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District of the Virginia Department of Health reported a new outbreak of COVID-19 this morning, its first in an educational setting. The outbreak designation comes as a result of three confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Bradley Elementary School in Warrenton.

No new outbreak was announced after the first two cases were confirmed. On Aug. 1, RRHD Health Director Wade Kartchner explained why that situation did not qualify as an outbreak: “In defining an outbreak, in addition to numbers, we need to ascertain whether or not transmission is occurring at a given location between people. Because if community transmission is occurring, the likelihood of two people testing positive and who just happen to work in the same place is fairly high. In this instance, our investigation leads us to believe that is the case, and we haven't seen any further transmission at that particular workplace. Subsequent tests on others have been negative,” he said.

However, after the outbreak in an educational setting was announced Thursday morning, Kartchner said, “Another person tested positive who works at the school.”

Fauquier County Public Schools spokeswoman Tara Helkowski said after last week’s report of two confirmed cases, “FCPS has an established protocol to work with the local health department to manage COVID-19 cases. We continue to follow all procedures established by the [Virginia Department of Health] and the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]. Once we were made aware of the first case on July 27, we contacted the VDH, worked with the Fauquier County Employee Wellness Center, and notified anyone who was potentially exposed.”

Before this most recent outbreak, the RRHD’s last new outbreak was on July 21, its fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with 10 cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 324 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,320 cases and 1,273 deaths), 221 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 48 in health care settings, 29 in educational settings.

Daily update

Fauquier County showed one new death in yesterday’s COVID-19 data provided by the Virginia Department of Health. Before Wednesday, the county had not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7. Fauquier has logged a total of nine deaths since April 9. Demographic data for the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District shows that the most recent fatality was a woman between 60 and 69 years old.

In Fauquier, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 592, four more than yesterday; four were added Tuesday and Wednesday and six on Monday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Hospitalizations remain at 34 for the county; there has not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

According to the Virginia Department of Health's latest report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 5), Virginia added 818 new cases of COVID-19 Thursday morning. Yesterday the state reported 798 cases, the lowest number of new cases since July 9, when 613 were added. The state added 1,145 Tuesday and 1,324 Monday (the fourth-highest number of new cases in one day). The state reported 1,505 new cases on July 27 (the second-highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

New cases have topped 1,000 eight times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 95,867 (3,623 probable).

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,183 (48 probable), 57 more than yesterday. Friday, July 31, 80 new hospitalizations were recorded. Before Friday, the VDH had not logged 80 hospitalizations since July 23, when 86 were added. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,349 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 45 more than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 875 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 474 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,635 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,183.

According to VDH data, 25 new deaths have been reported in the state as of Thursday. 2,299 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (108 probable). On Saturday Aug. 1, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded.(Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.3% for the state as of Thursday’s report; it has been hovering around that number since July 26. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14; today it is 4.2%.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 5: Fauquier County showed one new death in today’s COVID-19 data provided by the Virginia Department of Health. Before today, the county had not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7. Fauquier has logged a total of nine deaths since April 9. Demographic data for the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District shows that the fatality was a woman between 60 and 69 years old.

In Fauquier, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 588, four more than yesterday; four were added Tuesday and six on Monday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Hospitalizations remain at 34 for the county; there has not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

According to the Virginia Department of Health's latest report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 4), Virginia added 798 new cases of COVID-19 Wednesday morning – the lowest number of new cases since July 9, when 613 were added. The state added 1,145 Tuesday and 1,324 Monday (the fourth-highest number of new cases in one day). The state reported 1,505 new cases on July 27 (the second-highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

New cases have topped 1,000 eight times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 95,049 (3,576 probable).

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,126 (49 probable), 41 more than yesterday. Tuesday, 67 were added; Monday, 53 new hospitalizations were added; Saturday, 45 hospitalizations were added; Friday, 80 new hospitalizations were recorded. Before Friday, the VDH had not logged 80 hospitalizations since July 23, when 86 were added. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,304 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 132 more than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 881 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 423 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,522 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,126.

According to VDH data, 30 new deaths have been reported in the state as of Wednesday. 2,274 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (110 probable). Twenty-six new deaths were reported yesterday; no new deaths were reported Monday and 3 deaths were reported Sunday; on Saturday, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded.(Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.2% for the state as of Tuesday’s report; it has been hovering around that number since July 26. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14; yesterday it was 3.8 and today it is 4.3%.

The RRHD reported its last new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with 10 cases – one more than yesterday. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 321 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,277 cases and 1,267 deaths), 217 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 48 in health care settings, 26 in educational settings.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

Trouble spots in the state

Wednesday data from VDH shows that several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has had 3,507 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Buckingham County has had 3,512 cases per 100,00 people; Prince William has had 1,952 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has had 1,858; Sussex has had 2,500; Shenandoah, 1,577; Fairfax, 1,392; Loundoun County, 1,257, and the city of Richmond, 1,326. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,347) and Northhampton (2,513) also have had a large per-capita number of cases.

Fauquier County is logging 832 cases per 100,000 residents.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced July 28 a new executive order aimed at slowing the rise of COVID-19 cases in and around the Hampton Roads area; the plan includes prohibiting the sale of alcohol after 10 p.m., limiting restaurant capacity and banning social gatherings of more than 50 people.

TUESDAY, AUG. 5: According to the Virginia Department of Health's latest report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 3), Virginia added 1,145 new cases of COVID-19 Tuesday morning, after adding 1,324 yesterday; that was the fourth-highest number of new cases in one day. The state added 981 cases Sunday, 913 cases Saturday, 984 cases Friday. The state reported 1,505 new cases on July 27 (the second-highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

New cases have topped 1,000 eight times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 94,251 (3,523 probable).

In Fauquier County, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 584, four more than yesterday; six were added Monday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county; there has not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There were seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,085 (48 probable), 67 more than yesterday. Monday, 53 new hospitalizations were added; Saturday, 45 hospitalizations were added; Friday, 80 new hospitalizations were recorded. Before Friday, the VDH had not logged 80 hospitalizations since July 23, when 86 were added. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,172 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 83 more than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 880 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 375 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,385 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,085.

According to VDH data, 26 new deaths have been reported in the state as of Tuesday. 2,244 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (110 probable). No new deaths were reported yesterday and 3 deaths were reported Monday; on Saturday, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded.(Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.2% for the state as of Tuesday’s report; it has been hovering around that number since July 26. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14 and today it is 3.8%.

The RRHD reported its last new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 320 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,229 cases and 1,254 deaths), 215 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 48 in health care settings, 26 in educational settings.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

The long view

A weekly summary released Friday afternoon from the Virginia Department of Health reveals that 11 health districts – including the Rappahannock Health District, which includes Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange and Rappahannock counties -- are experiencing surges in COVID-19 cases. The local health district surges are mostly fueled by more cases in Madison and Orange counties.

Other health districts experiencing surges include seven in the Hampton Roads area. Surges in Thomas Jefferson and Three Rivers have abated.

The VDH weekly report projects, “On its current course, Virginia is projected to have 13,000 weekly confirmed cases, and growing, by early September. On July 18, the reproduction rate dipped below 1.0 statewide, including a large drop in the eastern region. The reproduction rate has been volatile as cases have surged.”

The summary also states that the COVID-19 projection model provided by the UVA Biocomplexity Institute “estimates that Virginia's cautious approach to reopening prevented 827,377 confirmed cases in Virginia since May 15. While cases are surging in Hampton Roads, the model does not project that hospital capacity will be overwhelmed during the projection window (through Sept. 6.)

“… growth could be rapid into the fall… new weekly cases are expected [to] peak at 12,926 (and growing) by early September. With a statewide surge, that increases to 15,858.”

The report states that some areas of Virginia have done a good job at preventing the spread of COVID-19. “In these areas, there was no rebound following the phased reopening beginning May 15 -- at least not yet. Rather, transmission rates stayed at the same level as they had during the stay at home order. Essentially, people learned to live with COVID-19. Masks, hand washing, social distancing, and good business practices allow people to get on with their lives while minimizing the spread.”

The report concludes, “We cannot rest on our laurels though. As of July 29, Virginia has recorded 2,125 lives lost due to COVID-19. Another 7,738 people have been hospitalized. In recent weeks, almost a dozen of Virginia's 35 health districts have experienced surges… Beating COVID-19 is a marathon, not a sprint. It requires all of us to do our part to stop the spread.”

Trouble spots in the state

Monday data from VDH shows that several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has had 3,507 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Buckingham County has had 3,506 cases per 100,00 people; Prince William has had 1,942 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has had 1,855; Sussex has had 2,491; Shenandoah, 1,574; Fairfax, 1,389; Loundoun County, 1,251, and the city of Richmond, 1,317. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,338) and Northhampton (2,513) also have had a large per-capita number of cases.

Fauquier County is logging 826 cases per 100,000 residents.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced July 28 a new executive order aimed at slowing the rise of COVID-19 cases in and around the Hampton Roads area; the plan includes prohibiting the sale of alcohol after 10 p.m., limiting restaurant capacity and banning social gatherings of more than 50 people.

MONDAY, AUG. 3: According to the VDH's latest report (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Sunday, Aug.  2), Virginia added 1,324 new cases of COVID-19 Monday morning. That is the fourth-highest number of new cases in one day. Yesterday, the state added 981 new cases. That’s after adding 913 cases Saturday, 984 cases Friday, 911 Thursday and 999 Wednesday. The state reported 1,505 new cases on July 27 (the second-highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

New cases have topped 1,000 seven times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 93,106 (3,504 probable).

In the county, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 580, six more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county; there has not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There have been seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 8,018 (48 probable), 53 more than yesterday. Saturday, 45 hospitalizations were added to the total, Friday, 80 new hospitalizations were added; before Friday, the VDH had not recorded 80 hospitalizations since July 23, when 86 were added. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,172 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 33 more than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 883 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 322 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,255 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 8,018.

According to VDH data, no new deaths have been reported in the state as of Monday. 2,218 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (110 probable). Yesterday, 3 new deaths were reported; on Saturday, new deaths were reported at 41 --  the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded.(Note: Deaths are listed by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.1% for the state as of Monday’s report, just slightly down from the 7.2% where the rate had been stable for the last few days. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14 and today it is 3.9%.

The RRHD reported its last new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 318 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,180 cases and 1,242 deaths), 213 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 47 in health care settings, 26 in educational settings.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

The long view

A weekly summary released Friday afternoon from the Virginia Department of Health reveals that 11 health districts – including the Rappahannock Health District, which includes Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange and Rappahannock counties -- are experiencing surges in COVID-19 cases. The local health district surges are mostly fueled by more cases in Madison and Orange counties.

Other health districts experiencing surges include seven in the Hampton Roads area. Surges in Thomas Jefferson and Three Rivers have abated.

The VDH weekly report projects, “On its current course, Virginia is projected to have 13,000 weekly confirmed cases, and growing, by early September. On July 18, the reproduction rate dipped below 1.0 statewide, including a large drop in the eastern region. The reproduction rate has been volatile as cases have surged.”

The summary also states that the COVID-19 projection model provided by the UVA Biocomplexity Institute “estimates that Virginia's cautious approach to reopening prevented 827,377 confirmed cases in Virginia since May 15. While cases are surging in Hampton Roads, the model does not project that hospital capacity will be overwhelmed during the projection window (through Sept. 6.)

“… growth could be rapid into the fall… new weekly cases are expected [to] peak at 12,926 (and growing) by early September. With a statewide surge, that increases to 15,858.”

The report states that some areas of Virginia have done a good job at preventing the spread of COVID-19. “In these areas, there was no rebound following the phased reopening beginning May 15 -- at least not yet. Rather, transmission rates stayed at the same level as they had during the stay at home order. Essentially, people learned to live with COVID-19. Masks, hand washing, social distancing, and good business practices allow people to get on with their lives while minimizing the spread.”

The report concludes, “We cannot rest on our laurels though. As of July 29, Virginia has recorded 2,125 lives lost due to COVID-19. Another 7,738 people have been hospitalized. In recent weeks, almost a dozen of Virginia's 35 health districts have experienced surges… Beating COVID-19 is a marathon, not a sprint. It requires all of us to do our part to stop the spread.”

Trouble spots in the state

Monday data from VDH shows that several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has had 3,507 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Buckingham County has had 3,506 cases per 100,00 people; Prince William has had 1,920 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has had 1,845; Sussex has had 2,482; Shenandoah, 1,565; Fairfax, 1,382; Loundoun County, 1,243, and the city of Richmond, 1,307. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,332) and Northhampton (2,505) also have had a large per-capita number of cases.

Fauquier County is logging 820 cases per 100,000 residents.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced July 28 a new executive order aimed at slowing the rise of COVID-19 cases in and around the Hampton Roads area; the plan includes prohibiting the sale of alcohol after 10 p.m., limiting restaurant capacity and banning social gatherings of more than 50 people.

said the measures would be limited, for now, to the Hampton Roads area, which generally includes Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and the surrounding localities.

MONDAY, AUG. 3: A weekly summary released Friday afternoon from the Virginia Department of Health reveals that 11 health districts – including the Rappahannock Health District, which includes Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange and Rappahannock counties -- are experiencing surges in COVID-19 cases. The local health district surges are mostly fueled by more cases in Madison and Orange counties.

Other health districts experiencing surges include seven in the Hampton Roads area. Surges in Thomas Jefferson and Three Rivers have abated.

The VDH weekly report projects, “On its current course, Virginia is projected to have 13,000 weekly confirmed cases, and growing, by early September. On July 18, the reproduction rate dipped below 1.0 statewide, including a large drop in the eastern region. The reproduction rate has been volatile as cases have surged.”

The summary also states that the COVID-19 projection model provided by the UVA Biocomplexity Institute “estimates that Virginia's cautious approach to reopening prevented 827,377 confirmed cases in Virginia since May 15. While cases are surging in Hampton Roads, the model does not project that hospital capacity will be overwhelmed during the projection window (through Sept. 6.)

“… growth could be rapid into the fall… new weekly cases are expected [to] peak at 12,926 (and growing) by early September. With a statewide surge, that increases to 15,858.”

The report states that some areas of Virginia have done a good job at preventing the spread of COVID-19. “In these areas, there was no rebound following the phased reopening beginning May 15 -- at least not yet. Rather, transmission rates stayed at the same level as they had during the stay at home order. Essentially, people learned to live with COVID-19. Masks, hand washing, social distancing, and good business practices allow people to get on with their lives while minimizing the spread.”

The report concludes, “We cannot rest on our laurels though. As of July 29, Virginia has recorded 2,125 lives lost due to COVID-19. Another 7,738 people have been hospitalized. In recent weeks, almost a dozen of Virginia's 35 health districts have experienced surges… Beating COVID-19 is a marathon, not a sprint. It requires all of us to do our part to stop the spread.”

Trouble spots in the state

Sunday data from VDH shows that several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has had 3,507 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Buckingham County has had 3,506 cases per 100,00 people; Prince William has had 1,903 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has had 1,833; Sussex has had 2,465; Shenandoah, 1,563; Fairfax, 1,370; Loundoun County, 1,237, and the city of Richmond, 1,288. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,329) and Northhampton (2,488) also have had a large per-capita number of cases.

Fauquier County is logging 812 cases per 100,000 residents.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced July 28 a new executive order aimed at slowing the rise of COVID-19 cases in and around the Hampton Roads area; the plan includes prohibiting the sale of alcohol after 10 p.m., limiting restaurant capacity and banning social gatherings of more than 50 people.

Northam said the measures would be limited, for now, to the Hampton Roads area, which generally includes Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and the surrounding localities. Northam did not say, however, exactly which jurisdictions would be covered by the new order. 

Today’s data from VDH

According to the VDH's report Sunday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug.  1), Virginia has added 981 new cases of COVID-19 since Saturday. Yesterday, the state added 913 new cases. That’s after adding 984 cases Friday, 911 yesterday and 999 Wednesday. The state added 1,505 new cases Monday, July 27 (the highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

New cases have topped 1,000 six times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 91,782 (3,458 probable).

In the county, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 574, two more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county; there has not been a new hospitalization reported since July 24. Hospitalizations are reported by the county the patient lives in, not the location of the hospital. There have been seven hospitalizations of Fauquier residents so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 7,955 (48 probable), 45 more than yesterday. Friday, 80 new hospitalizations were added; the VDH has not recorded 80 hospitalizations since July 23, when 86 were added. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,172 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 84 fewer than yesterday. The VHHA breaks it down further. The association reports that 858 patients are currently hospitalized with confirmed cases for COVID-19; 315 patients whose results are pending are receiving hospital care.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,108 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 7,955.

As of Sunday, 2,218 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (110 probable), only 3 since yesterday. Yesterday, when new deaths were reported at 41, was the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded.(Note: Deaths are listed here by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.2% for the state as of Sunday’s report, the same as the last few days. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14 and today it is 3.7%.

The RRHD reported its last new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 318 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,128 cases and 1,240 deaths), 211 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 46 in health care settings, 26 in educational settings.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

SATURDAY. AUG. 1: A weekly summary released Friday afternoon from the Virginia Department of Health reveals that 11 health districts – including the Rappahannock Health District, which includes Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange and Rappahannock counties -- are experiencing surges in COVID-19 cases. The local health district surges are mostly fueled by more cases in Madison and Orange counties.

Other health districts experiencing surges include seven in the Hampton Roads area. Surges in Thomas Jefferson and Three Rivers have abated.

The VDH weekly report projects, “On its current course, Virginia is projected to have 13,000 weekly confirmed cases, and growing, by early September. On July 18, the reproduction rate dipped below 1.0 statewide, including a large drop in the eastern region. The reproduction rate has been volatile as cases have surged.”

The summary also states that the COVID-19 projection model provided by the UVA Biocomplexity Institute “estimates that Virginia's cautious approach to reopening prevented 827,377 confirmed cases in Virginia since May 15. While cases are surging in Hampton Roads, the model does not project that hospital capacity will be overwhelmed during the projection window (through Sept. 6.)

“However, the ‘current course’ scenario is tracking close to the ‘with surge’ scenario each week, as areas of the state match the surge scenarios. If this continues, growth could be rapid into the fall… “new weekly cases are expected [to] peak at 12,926 (and growing) by early September. With a statewide surge, that increases to 15,858.”

The report states that some areas of Virginia have done a good job at preventing the spread of COVID-19. “In these areas, there was no rebound following the phased reopening beginning May 15 -- at least not yet. Rather, transmission rates stayed at the same level as they had during the stay at home order. Essentially, people learned to live with COVID-19. Masks, hand washing, social distancing, and good business practices allow people to get on with their lives while minimizing the spread.”

The report concludes, “We cannot rest on our laurels though. As of July 29, Virginia has recorded 2,125 lives lost due to COVID-19. Another 7,738 people have been hospitalized. In recent weeks, almost a dozen of Virginia's 35 health districts have experienced surges… Beating COVID-19 is a marathon, not a sprint. It requires all of us to do our part to stop the spread.”

Trouble spots in the state

Saturday data from VDH shows that several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has had 3,518 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Buckingham County has had 3,494 cases per 100,00 people; Prince William has had 1,900 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has had 1,824; Sussex has had 2,465; Shenandoah, 1,551; Fairfax, 1,363; Loundoun County, 1,232, and the city of Richmond, 1,283. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,322) and Northhampton (2,488) also have had a large per-capita number of cases.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced July 28 a new executive order aimed at slowing the rise of COVID-19 cases in and around the Hampton Roads area; the plan includes prohibiting the sale of alcohol after 10 p.m., limiting restaurant capacity and banning social gatherings of more than 50 people.

Northam said the measures would be limited, for now, to the Hampton Roads area, which generally includes Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and the surrounding localities. Northam did not say, however, exactly which jurisdictions would be covered by the new order. 

Today’s data from VDH

According to the VDH's report Saturday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Friday, July 31), Virginia has added 913 new cases of COVID-19 since Friday. That’s after adding 984 cases Friday, 911 yesterday and 999 Wednesday. The state added 1,505 new cases Monday, July 27 (the highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

New cases have topped 1,000 six times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 90,801 (3,434 probable).

Fauquier County is logging 809 cases per 100,000 residents. In the county, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 572, one more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases were added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county, the same as the last few days. There have been seven hospitalizations so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 7,910 (48 probable), 44 more than yesterday. Yesterday, 80 new hospitalizations were added; the VDH has not recorded  80 hospitalizations since July 23, when 86 were added. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,256 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 78 fewer than yesterday.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 12,007 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 7,910.

As of Saturday, 2,215 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (110 probable), 41 since yesterday. Today was the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded. Yesterday, there were 33 COVID-19 fatalities. (Note: Deaths are listed here by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.2% for the state as of Saturday’s report. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14, then was on the decline, but has risen again in the last few days. On July 23 it was reported at 3.2%; today it is 4.2%.

The RRHD reported a new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 318 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,113 cases and 1,239 deaths), 211 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 48 in correctional facilities, 45 in health care settings, 26 in educational settings.

More information may be found at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

FRIDAY, JULY 31: According to the Virginia Health Department’s data report Friday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Thursday, July 30), Virginia has added 984 new cases of COVID-19 since Thursday. That’s after adding 911 yesterday, 999 Wednesday, 922 Tuesday and 1,505 new cases Monday morning (the highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

New cases have topped 1,000 six times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported. According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 89,888 (3,387 probable).

Total hospitalizations in the state since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 7,866 (46 probable), 80 more than yesterday. The VDH has not recorded as many new hospitalizations since July 23, when 86 were added. The greatest number of new hospitalizations in one day was recorded on April 19, when 126 were recorded.

As of Friday, 2,174 Virginians have died from COVID-19 (106 probable), 33 since yesterday. Today was the highest one-day death count since May 28, when the pandemic high of 57 deaths was recorded. (Note: Deaths are listed here by the date they were reported, not by the date they occurred.)

Analysis from the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association states that 1,334 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 23 fewer than yesterday.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 11,937 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 7,866.

Several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has had 3,496 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Greensville County has had 3,586 cases per 100,00 people; Prince William has had 1,888 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has had 1,816; Sussex has had 2,456; Shenandoah, 1,533; Fairfax, 1,357; Loundoun County, 1,227, and the city of Richmond, 1,264. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,313) and Northhampton (2,488) also have had a large per-capita number of cases.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced Tuesday a new executive order aimed at slowing the rise of COVID-19 cases in and around the Hampton Roads area; the plan includes prohibiting the sale of alcohol after 10 p.m., limiting restaurant capacity and banning social gatherings of more than 50 people.

Northam said the measures would be limited, for now, to the Hampton Roads area, which generally includes Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and the surrounding localities. Northam did not say, however, exactly which jurisdictions would be covered by the new order. 

Fauquier County is logging 807 cases per 100,000 residents. In the county, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 571, the same as yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 to 16 on July 12. In the month of July, 147 new cases have been added, as compared to June, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county, the same as the last few days. There have been seven hospitalizations so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.2% for the state as of Friday’s report. On June 24, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14, then was on the decline, but has risen again in the last few days. On July 23 it was reported at 3.2%; today it is 4.3%.

The RRHD reported a new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 317 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,062 cases and 1,231 deaths), 210 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 47 in correctional facilities, 45 in health care settings, 26 in educational settings.

Demographics

A look at the numbers by age, gender and ethnicity shows that all residents have not been affected equally. For instance, although men and women seem to be represented equally in case numbers, both in the local health district and in the state, men represent a greater number of hospitalizations and deaths. In the RRHD, there have been 920 cases in women and 897 in men, but 53 women have been hospitalized compared to 79 men. Sixteen men and 10 women have died from COVID-19 in the health district.

In the state, 45,943 women have tested positive compared to 43,419 men, but 4,253 men have been hospitalized compared to 3,607 women. Death data shows that 1,065 women and 1,104 men have died.

When examining case numbers by age group, data shows that younger people make up the majority of those who have been infected. In the health district, those in the 30 to 39 year old age group record the most cases (362), followed by the 20 to 29 year olds (348) and the 40 to 49 year olds (343). Only 30 80-plus residents have tested positive and 47 residents between 70 and 79.

Case numbers for the state show that 16,893 residents between 20 and 29 have tested positive; 16,369 between 30 and 39 and 14,960 between 40 and 49. Those in the 70 to 79 year old group total 4,366 and case numbers for those 80 or older are at 4,198.

Seventeen people older than 70 have died in the health district, while nine under 70 have died.

In the state, the majority of people who have died have been older than 80 (1,077), compared to a total of 1,095 for all residents 79 and younger.

Hospitalizations show more younger adults are becoming ill enough to require acute care. In the health district, 32 people from 50 to 59 have been hospitalized, the largest age group. Twenty-one residents between 40 and 49 were hospitalized; the 60 to 60 year old group also has had 21 hospitalizations. Eighteen who are aged 30 to 39 were hospitalized. Seventeen individuals 80 or older have been hospitalized.

In the state, 1,562 COVID-19 positive residents in the 60 to 69 age group have been hospitalized, followed by 1,445 of those aged 50 to 59. In the 70 to 79 age group the number of hospitalized is 1,283 and about the same number (1,272) of those 80 and older have been in the hospital for the coronavirus.

Looking at ethnicity in the health district, Latinos reported a higher number of cases (700) than white residents (472) or Black residents (115), although they make up a smaller percentage of residents. In the state, the same is true; Latinos represent 26,198 cases and whites account for 20,700 cases. Black residents account for 16,026 cases.

The hospitalization numbers are similar. In the health district, 57 Latinos were hospitalized, as compared to 40 white residents and 20 Black residents.

In the state, hospitalization numbers were: 2,577 for Latinos, 2,357 for whites and 2,084 for Blacks.

Six Black residents and six Latinos have died in the health district from the coronavirus; 12 whites have lost their lives to the disease. In the state, 236 Latinos, 528 Blacks and 1,182 whites have died.

THURSDAY, JULY 30: According to the Virginia Health Department’s data report Thursday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, July 29), Virginia has added 911 new cases of COVID-19 since Wednesday. That’s after adding 999 Wednesday, 922 Tuesday and 1,505 new cases Monday morning (the highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

New cases have topped 1,000 six times since July 15. Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported.

According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 88,904 (3,358 probable). Total hospitalizations since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 7,786 (46 probable), 48 more than yesterday; 2,141 Virginians have died (106 probable), 16 since yesterday. VDH reported 30 deaths Wednesday.

Analysis from the Virginia Public Access Project states that 1,357 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s seven more than yesterday. Yesterday morning it was reported that 56 more patients were hospitalized in COVID-19 beds on Wednesday than had been on Tuesday.

The Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association website shows that Virginia has not had more COVID-19 hospitalizations since June 2, when the number of residents occupying COVID-19 beds was 1,362.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in slightly different ways, so their data does not always match up. For instance, VHHA reports that 11,728 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized and discharged, but VDH reports that the total number of COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic is 7,786. VPAP gets most, but not all of its data from VDH.

Several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has 3,507 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Prince William has 1,876 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has 1,808; Sussex has 2,456; Shenandoah has 1,528; Fairfax has 1,356; Loundoun County has 1,225 and the city of Richmond has 1,248. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,313) and Northhampton (2,488) also have a large per-capita number of cases.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced Tuesday a new executive order aimed at slowing the rise of COVID-19 cases in and around the Hampton Roads area; the plan includes prohibiting the sale of alcohol after 10 p.m., limiting restaurant capacity and banning social gatherings of more than 50 people.

Northam said the measures would be limited, for now, to the Hampton Roads area, which generally includes Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and the surrounding localities. Northam did not say, however, exactly which jurisdictions would be covered by the new order. 

Fauquier County is logging 807 cases per 100,000 residents. In the county, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 571, one more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 on July 1 to 16 on July 12. In July, 147 new cases have been added, as compared to June 1 to 30, when the county added a total of 114 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county, the same as the last few days. There have been seven hospitalizations so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.2% for the state as of Thursday’s report. On June 28, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14, then was on the decline, but has risen again in the last few days. A week ago it was reported at 3.2%; today it is 4.4%.

The RRHD reported a new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 316 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 8,003 cases and 1,218 deaths), 202 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 47 in correctional facilities, 44 in health care settings, 26 in educational settings.

Demographics

A look at the numbers by age, gender and ethnicity shows that all residents have not been affected equally. For instance, although men and women seem to be represented equally in case numbers, both in the local health district and in the state, men represent a greater number of hospitalizations and deaths. In the RRHD, there have been 915 cases in women and 895 in men, but 53 women have been hospitalized compared to 78 men. Sixteen men and 10 women have died from COVID-19 in the health district.

In the state, 45,421 women have tested positive compared to 42,960 men, but 4,207 men have been hospitalized compared to 3,573 women. Death data shows that 1,055 women and 1,082 men have died.

When examining case numbers by age group, data shows that younger people make up the majority of those who have been infected. In the health district, those in the 30 to 39 year old age group record the most cases (362), followed by the 20 to 29 year olds (346) and the 40 to 49 year olds (342). Only 30 80-plus residents have tested positive and 47 residents between 70 and 79.

Case numbers for the state show that 16,893 residents between 20 and 29 have tested positive; 16,369 between 30 and 39 and 14,960 between 40 and 49. Those in the 70 to 79 year old group total 4,366 and case numbers for those 80 or older are at 4,198.

Seventeen people older than 70 have died in the health district, while nine under 70 have died.

In the state, the majority of people who have died have been older than 80 (1,061), compared to a total of 1,098 for all residents 79 and younger.

Hospitalizations show more younger adults are becoming ill enough to require acute care. In the health district, 31 people from 50 to 59 have been hospitalized, the largest age group. Twenty-one residents between 40 and 49 were hospitalized; the 60 to 60 year old group also has had 21 hospitalizations. Eighteen who are aged 30 to 39 were hospitalized. Seventeen individuals 80 or older have been hospitalized.

In the state, 1,544 COVID-19 positive residents in the 60 to 69 age group have been hospitalized, followed by 1,427 of those aged 50 to 59. In the 70 to 79 age group the number of hospitalized is 1,269 and about the same number (1,267) of those 80 and older have been in the hospital for the coronavirus.

Looking at ethnicity in the health district, Latinos reported a higher number of cases (700) than white residents (467) or Black residents (115), although they make up a smaller percentage of residents. In the state, the same is true; Latinos represent 26,024 cases and whites account for 20,357 cases. Black residents account for 15,743 cases.

The hospitalization numbers are similar. In the health district, 57 Latinos were hospitalized, as compared to 39 white residents and 20 Black residents.

In the state, hospitalization numbers were: 2,549 for Latinos, 2,329 for whites and 2,067 for Blacks.

Six Black residents and six Latinos have died in the health district from the coronavirus; 12 whites have lost their lives to the disease. In the state, 235 Latinos, 518 Blacks and 1,160 whites have died.

More details may be found on the VDH website.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 30: According to the Virginia Health Department’s data report Wednesday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, July 26), Virginia has added 999 new cases of COVID-19 since Tuesday. That’s after adding 922 Tuesday and 1,505 new cases Monday morning (the highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied at the virus’s peak).

The new case total for Sunday was 958; 1,245 news cases were added Saturday and 1,127 new confirmed cases were added last Friday. New cases have topped 1,000 six times since July 15.

Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported.

According to the VDH, the total case count in Virginia stands at 87,993 (3,293 probable). Total hospitalizations since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 7,738 (46 probable), 52 more than yesterday; 2,125 Virginians have died (105 probable), 30 since yesterday. The number of deaths in the state today is the highest since July 7, when Virginia lost 32 residents to the virus.

Analysis from the Virginia Public Access Project states that 1,350 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 56 more than yesterday.

The Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association website shows that Virginia has not had as many COVID-19 hospitalizations since June 2, when the number of residents occupying COVID-19 beds was 1,362.

The VDH and VHHA compile statistics in slightly different ways, so their data does not always match up perfectly. VPAP gets most, but not all of their data from VDH.

Several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has 3,485 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Prince William has 1,862 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has 1,801; Newport News has 1,519; Fairfax has 1,352; Loundoun County has 1,220 and the city of Richmond has 1,237. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,307) and Northhampton (2,530) also have a large per-capita number of cases.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced Tuesday a new executive order aimed at slowing the rise of COVID-19 cases in and around the Hampton Roads area; the plan includes prohibiting the sale of alcohol after 10 p.m., limiting restaurant capacity and banning social gatherings of more than 50 people.

Northam said the measures would be limited, for now, to the Hampton Roads area, which generally includes Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Newport News and the surrounding localities. Northam did not say, however, exactly which jurisdictions would be covered by the new order. 

Fauquier County is logging 806 cases per 100,000 residents. In the county, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 570, two more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 on July 1 to 16 on July 12. In July, 146 new cases have been added, as compared to June 1 to 29, when the county added a total of 111 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county, the same as the few days. There have been seven hospitalizations so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.1% for the state as of Wednesday’s report. On June 28, the rate was 5.8%. It has been slowly decreasing for the past few days.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14, then was on the decline, but has risen again in the last few days. A week ago it was reported at 3.2%; today it is 3.9%.

The RRHD reported a new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 310 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 7,945 cases and 1,217 deaths), 199 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 47 in correctional facilities, 44 in health care settings, 26 in educational settings. One outbreak in the health district is categorized as “other.”

Demographics

A look at the numbers by age, gender and ethnicity shows that all residents have not been affected equally. For instance, although men and women seem to be represented equally in case numbers, both in the local health district and in the state, men represent a greater number of hospitalizations and deaths. In the RRHD, there have been 915 cases in women and 890 in men, but 52 women have been hospitalized compared to 78 men. Sixteen men and 10 women have died from COVID-19 in the health district.

In the state, 44,492 women have tested positive compared to 42,537 men, but 4,183 men have been hospitalized compared to 3,549 women. Death data shows that 1,035 women and 1,057 men have died.

When examining case numbers by age group, data shows that younger people make up the majority of those who have been infected. In the health district, those in the 30 to 39 year old age group record the most cases (362), followed by the 20 to 29 year olds (344) and the 40 to 49 year olds (342). Only 30 80-plus residents have tested positive and 47 residents between 70 and 79.

Case numbers for the state show that 16,667 residents between 20 and 29 have tested positive; 16,201 between 30 and 39 and 14,839 between 40 and 49. Those in the 70 to 79 year old group total 4,331 and case numbers for those 80 or older are at 4,158.

Seventeen people older than 70 have died in the health district, while nine under 70 have died.

In the state, the majority of people who have died have been older than 80 (1,057), compared to a total of 1,066 for all residents 79 and younger.

Hospitalizations show more younger adults are becoming ill enough to require acute care. In the health district, 31 people from 50 to 59 have been hospitalized, the largest age group. Twenty-one residents between 40 and 49 were hospitalized, the second largest age group. Eighteen who are aged 30 to 39 were hospitalized, as well as 20 who are 60 to 69. Seventeen individuals 80 or older have been hospitalized.

In the state, 1,531 COVID-19 positive residents in the 60 to 69 age group have been hospitalized, followed by 1,418 of those aged 50 to 59. In the 70 to 79 age group the number of hospitalized is 1,265 and about the same number (1,259) of those 80 and older have been in the hospital for the coronavirus.

Looking at ethnicity in the health district, Latinos reported a higher number of cases (699) than white residents (466) or Black residents (114), although they make up a smaller percentage of residents. In the state, the same is true; Latinos represent 25,836 cases and whites account for 20,104 cases. Black residents account for 15,473 cases.

The hospitalization numbers are similar. In the health district, 57 Latinos were hospitalized, as compared to 38 white residents and 20 Black residents.

In the state, hospitalization numbers were: 2,543 for Latinos, 2,312 for whites and 2,047 for Blacks.

Six Black residents and six Latinos have died in the health district from the coronavirus; 12 whites have lost their lives to the disease. In the state, 234 Latinos, 512 Blacks and 1,151 whites have died.

More details may be found on the VDH website.

The long view

The Virginia Department of Health’s weekly overview on Virginia’s response to the coronavirus was released July 24. The report provides the following takeaways:

  • Twelve health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have approximately 15,000 weekly cases, and growing, by early September.
  • On July 11, the reproduction rate was above 1.0 statewide and in four of six HPP regions.
  • So far, projections do not anticipate hospitalizations will exceed capacity through August; however it is crucial to mitigate surges.
  • Social distancing appears to be waning, but infection control and other mitigation strategies are suppressing spread.

Further narrative from the VDH reads, “Last week, 10 of Virginia's 35 local health districts were experiencing surges … This week, that number increased to 12. While the Eastern Region, excluding Eastern Shore, continues to be the epicenter of the surge in Virginia, it is beginning to spread to other areas as well.

“Notably, Rappahannock-Rapidan [the health district that Fauquier belongs to] joined Thomas Jefferson in the Northwest Health Planning Region. Arlington also entered a surge in Northern Virginia. It is crucial that Virginians clamp down now to prevent these surges from growing and spreading.

“Cell phone data indicates that Virginians are increasingly returning to work and visiting local businesses, almost at pre-pandemic levels. This is good news, if residents and businesses follow the guidance in the Forward Virginia plan.

“In many areas, cases are surging among 20 to 39 year olds. Although this group is less likely to suffer the worst from COVID-19, a spike in cases puts us all at risk. It also risks a rollback of reopening plans, something we've seen in other states. Protect yourself and others by practicing proper social distancing and infection control. Virginia's health is in our hands.”

TUESDAY, JULY 29: According to the Virginia Health Department’s data report Tuesday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Monday, July 26), Virginia has added 922 new cases of COVID-19 since yesterday. That’s after adding 1,505 new cases Monday morning, the second highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied. The new case number for Sunday was 958; 1,245 news cases were added Saturday and 1,127 new confirmed cases were added Friday. New cases have topped 1,000 six times since July 15.

Several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has 3,496 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Prince William has 1,851 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has 1,797; Fairfax has 1,347; Loundoun County has 1,214 and the city of Richmond has 1,221. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,298) and Northhampton (2,539) also have a large per-capita number of cases.

By comparison, Fauquier County is logging 802 cases per 100,000 residents.

The total case count in Virginia stands at 86,994 (3,262 probable). Total hospitalizations since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 7,686 (46 probable), 39 more than yesterday; 2,095 Virginians have died (104 probable), 13 since yesterday.

Analysis from the Virginia Public Access Project states that 1,200 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s one fewer than yesterday. (As of 10 a.m. Monday, VPAP numbers for Fauquier had not been updated.)

Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported.

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.3% for the state as of Tuesday’s report. On June 28, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14, but has been declining since then. A week ago it was reported at 4.8%; today it is 3.6%.

The RRHD reported a new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 310 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 7,796 cases and 1,205 deaths), 196 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 47 in correctional facilities, 44 in health care settings and 25 in educational settings.

In Fauquier County, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 568, one more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 on July 1 to 16 on July 12. In July, 144 new cases have been added, as compared to June 1 to 28, when the county added a total of 111 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county, the same as the last couple of days. There have been seven hospitalizations so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

Demographics

A look at the numbers by age, gender and ethnicity shows that all residents have not been affected equally. For instance, although men and women seem to be represented equally in case numbers, both in the local health district and in the state, men represent a greater number of hospitalizations and deaths. In the RRHD, there have been 914 cases in women and 885 in men, but 52 women have been hospitalized compared to 78 men. Sixteen men and 10 women have died from COVID-19 in the health district.

In the state, 44,418 women have tested positive compared to 42,085 men, but 4,154 men have been hospitalized compared to 3,526 women. Death data shows that 1,035 women and 1,057 men have died.

When examining case numbers by age group, data shows that younger people make up the majority of those who have been infected. In the health district, those in the 30 to 39 year old age group record the most cases (360), followed by the 20 to 29 year olds (343) and the 40 to 49 year olds (339). Only 30 80-plus residents have tested positive and 47 residents between 70 and 79.

Case numbers for the state show that 16,431 residents between 20 and 29 have tested positive; 16,025 between 30 and 39 and 14,691 between 40 and 49. Those in the 70 to 79 year old group total  4,279 and case numbers for those 80 or older are at 4,130.

Seventeen people older than 70 have died in the health district, while nine under 70 have died.

In the state, the majority of people who have died have been older than 80 (1,043), compared to a total of 1,050 for all residents 79 and younger.

Hospitalizations show more younger adults are becoming ill enough to require acute care. In the health district, 31 people from 50 to 59 have been hospitalized, the largest age group. Twenty-one residents between 40 and 49 were hospitalized, the second largest age group. Eighteen who are aged 30 to 39 were hospitalized, as well as 20 who are 60 to 69. Seventeen individuals 80 or older have been hospitalized.

In the state, 1,520 COVID-19 positive residents in the 60 to 69 age group have been hospitalized, followed by 1,411 of those aged 50 to 59. In the 70 to 79 age group the number of hospitalized is 1,258 and about the same number (1,248) of those 80 and older have been in the hospital for the coronavirus.

Looking at ethnicity in the health district, Latinos reported a higher number of cases (695) than white residents (463) or Black residents (114), although they make up a smaller percentage of residents. In the state, the same is true; Latinos represent 25,713 cases and whites account for 19,845 cases. Black residents account for 15,197 cases.

The hospitalization numbers are similar. In the health district, 57 Latinos were hospitalized, as compared to 38 white residents and 20 Black residents.

In the state, hospitalization numbers were: 2,535 for Latinos, 2,293 for whites and 2,025 for Blacks.

Six Black residents and six Latinos have died in the health district from the coronavirus; 12 whites have lost their lives to the disease. In the state, 230 Latinos, 500 Blacks and 1,139 whites have died.

More details may be found on the VDH website.

The long view

The Virginia Department of Health’s weekly overview on Virginia’s response to the coronavirus was released July 24. The report provides the following takeaways:

  • Twelve health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have approximately 15,000 weekly cases, and growing, by early September.
  • On July 11, the reproduction rate was above 1.0 statewide and in four of six HPP regions.
  • So far, projections do not anticipate hospitalizations will exceed capacity through August; however it is crucial to mitigate surges.
  • Social distancing appears to be waning, but infection control and other mitigation strategies are suppressing spread.

Further narrative from the VDH reads, “Last week, 10 of Virginia's 35 local health districts were experiencing surges … This week, that number increased to 12. While the Eastern Region, excluding Eastern Shore, continues to be the epicenter of the surge in Virginia, it is beginning to spread to other areas as well.

“Notably, Rappahannock-Rapidan [the health district that Fauquier belongs to] joined Thomas Jefferson in the Northwest Health Planning Region. Arlington also entered a surge in Northern Virginia. It is crucial that Virginians clamp down now to prevent these surges from growing and spreading.

“Cell phone data indicates that Virginians are increasingly returning to work and visiting local businesses, almost at pre-pandemic levels. This is good news, if residents and businesses follow the guidance in the Forward Virginia plan.

“In many areas, cases are surging among 20 to 39 year olds. Although this group is less likely to suffer the worst from COVID-19, a spike in cases puts us all at risk. It also risks a rollback of reopening plans, something we've seen in other states. Protect yourself and others by practicing proper social distancing and infection control. Virginia's health is in our hands.”

MONDAY, JULY 27: According to the Virginia Health Department’s data report Monday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Sunday, July 26), Virginia has added 1,505 new cases of COVID-19 since yesterday, the second highest one-day jump since May 26, when 1,615 cases were tallied. The new case number for Sunday was 958; 1,245 news cases were added Saturday and 1,127 new confirmed cases were added Friday. New cases have topped 1,000 six times since July 15.

Several areas in the state have high per capita case numbers: The county of Richmond has 3,496 positive cases per 100,000 residents; Prince William has 1,833 cases per 100,000; Culpeper has 1,785; Fairfax has 1,343; Loundoun County and the city of Richmond each have 1,207. Small eastern shore communities areas Accomack (3,285) and Northhampton (2,530) also have a large per-capita number of cases.

By comparison, Fauquier is logging 802 cases per 100,000 residents.

The total case count in Virginia stands at 86,072 (3,201 probable). Total hospitalizations since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 7,647 (47 probable), 54 more than yesterday; 2,082 Virginians have died (103 probable), four since yesterday.

Analysis from the Virginia Public Access Project states that 1,201 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 27 fewer than yesterday. (As of 10 a.m. Monday, VPAP numbers for Fauquier had not been updated.)

Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported.

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.5% for the state as of Monday’s report. That rate has held steady for several days. On June 28, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14, but has been declining since then. A week ago it was reported at 4.8%; today it is 3.3%.

The RRHD reported a new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 307 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 7,789 cases and 1,203 deaths), 194 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 46 in correctional facilities, 44 in health care settings and 25 in educational settings.

In Fauquier County, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 567, eight more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 on July 1 to 16 on July 12. In July, 143 new cases have been added, as compared to June 1 to 27, when the county added a total of 111 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county, the same as the last couple of days. There have been seven hospitalizations so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

Demographics

A look at the numbers by age, gender and ethnicity shows that all residents have not been affected equally. For instance, although men and women seem to be represented equally in case numbers, both in the local health district and in the state, men represent a greater number of hospitalizations and deaths. In the RRHD, there have been 907 cases in women and 881 in men, but 52 women have been hospitalized compared to 77 men. Fifteen men and 10 women have died from COVID-19 in the health district.

In the state, 43,919 women have tested positive compared to 41,637 men, but 4,137 men have been hospitalized compared to 3,501 women. Death data shows that 1,029 women and 1,049 men have died.

When examining case numbers by age group, data shows that younger people make up the majority of those who have been infected. In the health district, those in the 30 to 39 year old age group record the most cases, followed by the 20 to 29 year olds (341) and the 40 to 49 year olds (337). Only 30 80-plus residents have tested positive and 47 residents between 70 and 79.

Case numbers for the state show that 16,197 residents between 20 and 29 have tested positive; 15, 853 between 30 and 39 and 14,540 between 40 and 49. Those in the 70 to 79 year old group today 4,239 and case numbers for those 80 or older are at 4,108.

Seventeen people older than 70 have died in the health district, while nine under 70 have died.

In the state, the majority of people who have died have been older than 80 (1,035), compared to a total of 1,045 for all residents 79 and younger.

Hospitalizations show more younger adults are becoming ill enough to require acute care. In the health district, 31 people from 50 to 59 have been hospitalized, the largest age group. Twenty-one residents between 40 and 49 were hospitalized, the second largest age group. Eighteen who are aged 30 to 39 were hospitalized, as well as 20 who are 60 to 69. Seventeen individuals 80 or older have been hospitalized.

In the state, 1,515 COVID-19 positive residents in the 60 to 69 age group have been hospitalized, followed by 1,409 of those aged 50 to 59. In the 70 to 79 age group the number of hospitalized is 1,245 and about the same number (1,237) of those 80 and older have been in the hospital for the coronavirus.

Looking at ethnicity in the health district, Latinos reported a higher number of cases (693) than white residents (457) or Black residents (114), although they make up a smaller percentage of residents. In the state, the same is true; Latinos represent 25,585 cases and whites account for 19,593 cases. Black residents account for 14,915 cases.

The hospitalization numbers are similar. In the health district, 57 Latinos were hospitalized, as compared to 38 white residents and 20 Black residents.

In the state, hospitalization numbers were: 2,534 for Latinos, 2,281 for whites and 2,006 for Blacks.

Six Black residents and six Latinos have died in the health district from the coronavirus; 12 whites have lost their lives to the disease. In the state, 231 Latinos, 495 Blacks and 1,130 whites have died.

More details may be found on the VDH website.

The long view

The Virginia Department of Health’s weekly overview on Virginia’s response to the coronavirus was released July 24. The report provides the following takeaways:

  • Twelve health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have approximately 15,000 weekly cases, and growing, by early September.
  • On July 11, the reproduction rate was above 1.0 statewide and in four of six HPP regions.
  • So far, projections do not anticipate hospitalizations will exceed capacity through August; however it is crucial to mitigate surges.
  • Social distancing appears to be waning, but infection control and other mitigation strategies are suppressing spread.

Further narrative from the VDH reads, “Last week, 10 of Virginia's 35 local health districts were experiencing surges … This week, that number increased to 12. While the Eastern Region, excluding Eastern Shore, continues to be the epicenter of the surge in Virginia, it is beginning to spread to other areas as well.

“Notably, Rappahannock-Rapidan [the health district that Fauquier belongs to] joined Thomas Jefferson in the Northwest Health Planning Region. Arlington also entered a surge in Northern Virginia. It is crucial that Virginians clamp down now to prevent these surges from growing and spreading.

“Cell phone data indicates that Virginians are increasingly returning to work and visiting local businesses, almost at pre-pandemic levels. This is good news, if residents and businesses follow the guidance in the Forward Virginia plan.

“In many areas, cases are surging among 20 to 39 year olds. Although this group is less likely to suffer the worst from COVID-19, a spike in cases puts us all at risk. It also risks a rollback of reopening plans, something we've seen in other states. Protect yourself and others by practicing proper social distancing and infection control. Virginia's health is in our hands.”

SUNDAY, JULY 26: The Virginia Department of Health’s weekly overview on Virginia’s response to the coronavirus was released July 24. The report provides the following takeaways:

  • Twelve health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have approximately 15,000 weekly cases, and growing, by early September.
  • On July 11, the reproduction rate was above 1.0 statewide and in four of six HPP regions.
  • So far, projections do not anticipate hospitalizations will exceed capacity through August; however it is crucial to mitigate surges.
  • Social distancing appears to be waning, but infection control and other mitigation strategies are suppressing spread.

Further narrative from the VDH reads, “Last week, 10 of Virginia's 35 local health districts were experiencing surges … This week, that number increased to 12. While the Eastern Region, excluding Eastern Shore, continues to be the epicenter of the surge in Virginia, it is beginning to spread to other areas as well.

“Notably, Rappahannock-Rapidan [the health district that Fauquier belongs to] joined Thomas Jefferson in the Northwest Health Planning Region. Arlington also entered a surge in Northern Virginia. It is crucial that Virginians clamp down now to prevent these surges from growing and spreading.

“Cell phone data indicates that Virginians are increasingly returning to work and visiting local businesses, almost at pre-pandemic levels. This is good news, if residents and businesses follow the guidance in the Forward Virginia plan.

“In many areas, cases are surging among 20 to 39 year olds. Although this group is less likely to suffer the worst from COVID-19, a spike in cases puts us all at risk. It also risks a rollback of reopening plans, something we've seen in other states. Protect yourself and others by practicing proper social distancing and infection control. Virginia's health is in our hands.”

Today's COVID-19 numbers

According to the Virginia Health Department’s data report Sunday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Saturday, July 25), Virginia has added 958 new cases of COVID-19 since yesterday; 1,245 news cases were added Saturday and 1,127 new confirmed cases added Friday. Yesterday’s number was the highest since June 7. New cases have topped 1,000 five times since July 15. 

The total case count in Virginia stands at 84,567 (3,174 probable). Total hospitalizations since the beginning of the pandemic stand at 7,593 (47 probable), 23 more than yesterday; 2,078 Virginians have died (103 probable), three since yesterday.

Analysis from the Virginia Public Access Project states that 1,201 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19. That’s 49 fewer than yesterday. (As of 10 a.m. Sunday, VPAP numbers for Fauquier had not been updated.)

Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported.

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.5% for the state as of Sunday’s report. On June 28, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14, but has been declining since then. Monday it was reported at 4.8%; today it is 3.2%.

The RRHD reported a new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 307 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 7,779 cases and 1,203 deaths), 194 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 46 in correctional facilities, 44 in health care settings and 25 in educational settings.

In Fauquier County, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 559, two more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 on July 1 to 16 on July 12. In July, 135 new cases have been added, as compared to June 1 to 26, when the county added a total of 110 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county, the same as the last couple of days. There have been seven hospitalizations so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

Demographics

A look at the numbers by age, gender and ethnicity shows that all residents have not been affected equally. For instance, although men and women seem to be represented equally in case numbers, both in the local health district and in the state, men represent a greater number of hospitalizations and deaths. In the RRHD, there have been 893 cases in women and 870 in men, but 52 women have been hospitalized compared to 77 men. Fourteen men and 10 women have died from COVID-19 in the health district.

In the state, 43,139 women have tested positive compared to 40,921 men, but 4,101 men have been hospitalized compared to 3,483 women. Death data shows that 1,028 women and 1,046 men have died.

Sixteen people older than 70 have died in the health district, while nine under 70 have died.

In the state, the majority of people who have died have been older than 80 (1,033), compared to a total of 1,043 for all residents 79 and younger.

Hospitalizations tell a slightly different story, one that shows more younger adults are becoming ill enough to require acute care. In the health district, 31 people from 50 to 59 have been hospitalized, the largest age group. Twenty-one residents between 40 and 49 were hospitalized, the second largest age group. Eighteen who are aged 30 to 39 were hospitalized, as well as 20 who are 60 to 69. Seventeen individuals 80 or older have been hospitalized.

In the state, 1,501 COVID-19 positive residents in the 60 to 69 age group have been hospitalized, followed by 1,395 of those aged 50 to 59. In the 70 to 79 age group the number of hospitalized is 1,235 and about the same number (1,227) of those 80 and older have been in the hospital for the coronavirus.

Looking at ethnicity in the health district, Latinos reported a higher number of cases (690) than white residents (449) or Black residents (111), although they make up a smaller percentage of residents. In the state, the same is true; Latinos represent 25,397 cases and whites account for 19,270 cases. Black residents account for 14,548 cases.

The hospitalization numbers are similar. In the health district, 57 Latinos were hospitalized, as compared to 38 white residents and 20 Black residents.

In the state, hospitalization numbers were: 2,530 for Latinos, 2,259 for whites and 1,984 for Blacks.

Six Black residents and six Latinos have died in the health district from the coronavirus; 11 whites have lost their lives to the disease. In the state, 230 Latinos, 494 Blacks and 1,129 whites have died.

More details may be found on the VDH website.

Saturday, July 25: The Virginia Department of Health’s weekly overview on Virginia’s response to the coronavirus was released July 24. The report provides the following takeaways:

  • Twelve health districts are experiencing surges, including eight in the Hampton Roads area.
  • On current course, Virginia is projected to have approximately 15,000 weekly cases, and growing, by early September.
  • On July 11, the reproduction rate was above 1.0 statewide and in four of six HPP regions.
  • So far, projections do not anticipate hospitalizations will exceed capacity through August; however it is crucial to mitigate surges.
  • Social distancing appears to be waning, but infection control and other mitigation strategies are suppressing spread.

Further narrative from the VDH reads, “Last week, 10 of Virginia's 35 local health districts were experiencing surges … This week, that number increased to 12. While the Eastern Region, excluding Eastern Shore, continues to be the epicenter of the surge in Virginia, it is beginning to spread to other areas as well.

“Notably, Rappahannock-Rapidan [the health district that Fauquier belongs to] joined Thomas Jefferson in the Northwest Health Planning Region. Arlington also entered a surge in Northern Virginia. It is crucial that Virginians clamp down now to prevent these surges from growing and spreading.

“Cell phone data indicates that Virginians are increasingly returning to work and visiting local businesses, almost at pre-pandemic levels. This is good news, if residents and businesses follow the guidance in the Forward Virginia plan.

“In many areas, cases are surging among 20- to 39-year-olds. Although this group is less likely to suffer the worst from COVID-19, a spike in cases puts us all at risk. It also risks a rollback of reopening plans, something we've seen in other states. Protect yourself and others by practicing proper social distancing and infection control. Virginia's health is in our hands.”

Today's COVID-19 numbers

According to the Virginia Health Department’s data report Saturday morning (which uses data finalized at 5 p.m. on Friday, July 24), Virginia has added 1,245 new cases of COVID-19 since yesterday; that number tops the 1,127 new confirmed cases added Friday, which was the highest number of new cases since June 7. New cases have topped 1,000 five times since July 15. 

The total case count in Virginia stands at 83,609 (3,129 probable). Total hospitalizations since the beginning of the pandemic total 7,570 (43 probable), 55 more than yesterday; 2,075 Virginians have died (103 probable), eight since yesterday.

Analysis from the Virginia Public Access Project states that 1,250 Virginians are currently hospitalized with COVID-19.

Between June 8 and July 9, case numbers were trending down, with a high of 716 new cases daily and a low of 354. The surge in cases in Virginia began to appear July 10, when 943 new cases were reported.

The seven-day positivity rate (total tests compared to positive tests) is at 7.5% for the state as of Saturday’s report. On June 28, the rate was 5.8%.

In the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, of which Fauquier County is a part, the positivity rate was 1.7% on July 1. It climbed to 5.4% on July 14, but has been declining since then. Monday it was reported at 4.8%; today it is 3.2%.

The RRHD reported a new outbreak July 21, the fourth in a long-term care facility. The data on the VDH site shows an “outbreak in progress,” at Culpeper Health and Rehab, with nine cases. No deaths have been reported from that outbreak.

In the health district, there have also been five outbreaks in congregate care settings and one in a health care setting since the beginning of the pandemic.

State-wide, there have been 307 outbreaks in long term care settings (resulting in 7,721 cases and 1,199 deaths), 194 outbreaks in congregate care settings, 45 in correctional facilities, 44 in health care settings and 25 in educational settings.

In Fauquier County, the cumulative total number of COVID-19 cases stands at 557, five more than yesterday. Since July 1, the number of new cases each day has varied from 0 on July 1 to 16 on July 12. In July, 133 new cases have been added, as compared to June 1 to 25, when the county added a total of 109 new cases.

Fauquier has not had a COVID-19 related death since July 7, and has logged a total of eight deaths since April 9. Hospitalizations are at 34 for the county, the same as yesterday. There have been seven hospitalizations so far in July; there were six in June, 11 in May and 10 in April.

Demographics

A look at the numbers by age, gender and ethnicity shows that all residents have not been affected equally. For instance, although men and women seem to be represented equally in case numbers, both in the local health district and in the state, men represent a greater number of hospitalizations and deaths. In the RRHD, there have been 889 cases in women and 867 in men, but 52 women have been hospitalized compared to 77 men. Fourteen men and 10 women have died from COVID-19 in the health district.

In the state, 43,619 women have tested positive compared to 40,494 men, but 4,094 men have been hospitalized compared to 3,467 women. Death data shows that 1,027 women and 1,044 men have died.

Sixteen people older than 70 have died in the health district, while nine under 70 have died.

In the state, the majority of people who have died have been older than 80 (1,031), compared to a total of 1,042 for all residents 79 and younger.

Hospitalizations tell a slightly different story, one that shows more younger adults are becoming ill enough to require acute care. In the health district, 31 people from 50 to 59 have been hospitalized, the largest age group. Twenty-one residents between 40 and 49 were hospitalized, the second largest age group. Eighteen who are aged 30 to 39 were hospitalized, as well as 20 who are 60 to 69. Seventeen individuals 80 or older have been hospitalized.

In the state, 1,498 COVID-19 positive residents in the 60 to 69 age group have been hospitalized, followed by 1,391 of those aged 50 to 59. In the 70 to 79 age group the number of hospitalized is 1,229 and about the same number (1,222) of those 80 and older have been in the hospital for the coronavirus.

Looking at ethnicity in the health district, Latinos reported a higher number of cases (689) than white residents (444) or Black residents (111), although they make up a smaller percentage of residents. In the state, the same is true; Latinos represent 25,315 cases and whites account for 19,001 cases. Black residents account for 14,268 cases.

The hospitalization numbers were similar. In the health district, 57 Latinos were hospitalized, as compared to 38 white residents and 20 Black residents.

In the state, hospitalization numbers were: 2,528 for Latinos, 2,249 for whites and 1,976 for Blacks.

Six Black residents and six Latinos have died in the health district from the coronavirus; 11 whites have lost their lives to the disease. In the state, 230 Latinos, 492 Blacks and 1,128 whites have died.

More details may be found on the VDH website.

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