UPDATED: Virginia added 130 COVID-19 cases Monday for a new total of 1,020 across the state. Fauquier is holding steady for the time being at six confirmed cases.

There have been 25 deaths attributed to COVID-19 in Virginia thus far.

As of Monday, March 30, 136 people had been hospitalized due to the disease, and 12,038 people had been tested across the state, according to the new data released by the Virginia Department of Health. 

Northern Virginia now has 512 cases, up 52 across the region, the new data show.

They include 26 in Alexandria, up one; 86 in Arlington, up two; seven in the City of Manassas, up two; 224 in Fairfax County, up 37;  79 in Prince William County, up seven; six in Spotsylvania County, up one; and 20 in Stafford County, up seven.

Patients between the ages of 50 and 59 still make up the largest percentage of the confirmed cases so far with 184, or 18% of the state's total, the data say. Fifty-somethings added 26 cases since Sunday, March 29, when the age group reported 158 cases.

Age groups with the next highest numbers of cases are now 40- through 49-year-olds and 60- through 69-year-olds. There were 176 cases among Virginians in their 40s, and 175 among Virginians in their 60s, the new data say.

The two groups, 40- through 49-year-olds and 60- through 69-year-olds, make up 17.3% and 17.2% of the state's total cases, respectively. 

There are 149 cases among Virginians between the ages of 20 and 29, who still make up the fourth-highest reporting age group. They now make up 14.6% of the state's cases, the new report says.

There are 145 cases among Virginians between the ages of 30 and 39, the age group reporting the fifth-largest number of cases. They now make up 14.2% of the state's total cases, the data say.

People between the ages of 70 and 79 comprise 10.9% of the state's total, with 111 cases. There are 61 cases among those older than 80, comprising 6% of the state's total.

There remain 19 cases among Virginians age 19 and younger, comprising the lowest percentage of confirmed cases.

Cases among 10 through 19-year-olds stood at 12 on Monday, or 1.2% of the state's total cases. There remain seven reported cases among children age 9 and younger, a number that comprises .7% of the state's total, according to the VDH.

Sunday, March 29: Virginia sets new 1-day COVID-19 record, up 151 cases. New totals:  890 statewide, 72 in Prince William

Virginia added 151 COVID-19 overnight, hitting a new one-day record. Total cases now stand at 890 across the state, while Prince William County reported 16 additional cases for a total of 72.

Deaths in the state tied to the pandemic rose to 22, up five. There have been 112 people hospitalized due to the disease, and 10,609 people had been tested across the state according to the new data. 

The City of Manassas Park reported its first case of COVID-19 on Sunday, March 29. The City of Manassas added one, for a total of five, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Northern Virginia now has 460 cases, up 75 across the region, the new data show.

They include 25 in Alexandria, up five; 84 in Arlington, up nine; five in the City of Manassas, up one; 187 in Fairfax County, up 31; 61 in Loudoun County, up seven; 72 in Prince William County, up 16; five in Spotsylvania County, up two; and 13 in Stafford County, up two. Fauquier County held steady with six cases.

Patients between the ages of 50 and 59 still make up the largest percentage of the confirmed cases so far with 158, or 17.8% of the state's total, the data say. Fifty-somethings added an additional 24 cases since Saturday, March 28, when the age group reported 134 cases.

Age groups with the next highest number of cases are now 60- through 69-year-olds and 40- through 49-year-olds. There were 151 cases among Virginians in their 60s, and 150 among Virginians in their 40s, the new data say.

The two groups make up 17% and 16.9% of the state's total cases, respectively. 

There are 135 cases among Virginians between the ages of 20 and 29, who now make up the fourth-highest reporting age group. They now make up 15.2% of the state's cases, the new report says.

There are 131 cases among Virginians between the ages of 30 and 39, the age group reporting the fifth-largest number of cases. They now make up 14.7% of the state's total cases, the data say.

People between the ages of 70 and 79 comprise 11.1% of the state's total, with 99 cases. There are 47 cases among those older than 80, comprising 5.3% of the state's total.

There are now 19 cases among Virginians age 19 and younger, which together comprise the lowest percentage of confirmed cases.

Cases among 10 through 19-year-olds stood at 12 on Sunday, or 1.3%, while there remain seven reported cases among children age 9 and younger, a number that comprised .8% of the state's total.

Saturday, March 28: Virginia adds 135 COVID-19 cases for 739 statewide, 56 in Prince William

Virginia's tally of COVID-19 cases rose to 739 on Saturday, up 135 since Friday. It is the second-largest one-day increase in cases so far. Deaths in the state tied to the pandemic rose to 17, up three.

Prince William County added 12 cases, for a total of 56, while the City of Manassas added one, for a total of four.

Fauquier County now has six confirmed cases, up two from Friday, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Northern Virginia now has 385 cases, the new data show.

They include 20 in Alexandria, up two; 75 in Arlington, up 12; four in the City of Manassas, up one; 156 in Fairfax County, up 32; six in Fauquier County, up two; 54 in Loudoun County, up 11; 56 in Prince William County, up 12; three in Spotsylvania County, up one. Stafford County held steady with 11 cases.

Patients between the ages of 50 and 59 now make up the largest percentage of the confirmed cases so far with 134, or 18.1% of the state's total, the data say.

Age groups with the next highest number of cases are 20- to 29-year-olds and 40- to 49-year-olds. Each group shows 122 cases, and each comprise 16.5% of the total.

There are 116 cases among Virginians between the ages of 60 and 69, the third-highest age group. They now make up 15.7% of the state's cases, the new report says.

There are 113 cases among Virginians between the ages of 30 and 39, the fourth-largest age group. They now make up 15.3% of the state's total cases, the data say.

People between the ages of 70 and 79 comprise 11% of the state's total, with 81 cases. There are 34 cases among those older than 80, comprising 4.6% of the state's total.

There are now 17 cases among Virginians age 19 and younger, which together comprise the lowest percentage of confirmed cases.

Cases among 10 through 19-year-olds stood at 10 on Saturday, or 1.4%, while there were seven reported cases among children age 9 and younger, a number that comprised .9% of the state's total.

Friday, March 27: Virginia sees largest one-day rise in COVID-19 cases up 144 to 604. Prince William cases rise to 44, up 8

Virginia's tally of COVID-19 cases rose to 604 on Friday, up 144 from the previous day. It is the largest one-day increase in cases so far. Deaths in the state tied to the pandemic rose by one to 14.

Prince William County added eight cases, for a total of 44, while the City of Manassas stayed steady at three. Fauquier County has reported four cases, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The number of cases in Northern Virginia now top 300. They include 18 cases in Alexandria, 63 cases in Arlington, three cases in the City of Manassas, 124 cases in Fairfax County, four cases in Fauquier County, 43 cases in Loudoun County, 44 cases in Prince William County, two in Spotsylvania County and 11 in Stafford County.

Patients between the ages of 50 and 59 make up the largest percentage of the confirmed cases -- 17.9 % -- so far, the data say.

There are 108 COVID-19 cases among patients ages 50 to 59 and 101 cases among patients ages 60 through 69. 

There are 93 cases among Virginians between the ages of 20 and 29, making up 15.4% of the state's total cases.

People between the ages of 40 and 49 comprise the third-largest group, with 100 cases or 16.6% of the state's total.

There have been seven cases among children age 9 and under, who comprise 1.2% of the state's total, and nine among young people ages 10 to 19, comprising 1.5%.

There have been 25 cases involving patients older than 80, comprising 4.1% of the state's total, the data say.

In terms of gender, men make up 51.8% of the state's cases, while women comprise 46.9%. The state has no gender to report for eight of the cases.

The VDH also included information about patients' race, but it is incomplete. There is no data for 62.4% percent of cases. Of the remaining cases, whites account for 156 cases, or 25.8%, while blacks make up 41 cases, or 6.8%, the data says.

There are 18 cases in Alexandria, 63 cases in Arlington, three cases in the City of Manassas, 124 cases in Fairfax County, four cases in Fauquier County, 43 cases in Loudoun County and 44 cases in Prince William County.

The data may be found at the Virginia Department of Health website

Thursday, March 26: Virginia's tally of COVID-19 cases rose to 460 on Thursday, up 69 from the previous day, while deaths in the state tied to the pandemic rose to 13.

Prince William County added four cases, for a total of 36, while the City of Manassas added one, for a total of three. Fauquier County reported its first case, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The VDH report for Thursday, March 26, also included more detailed information about the demographics of Virginians diagnosed with COVID-19. Patients between the ages of 50 and 70 make up the largest percentage of the confirmed cases so far, the data say.

There are 84 COVID-19 cases among patients ages 50 to 59 and 84 cases among patients ages 60 through 69. Both age groups each comprise 18.3% of the commonwealth's cases to date.

There are 73 cases among Virginians between the ages of 20 and 29, making up the next largest group or 15.9% of the state's total cases.

People between the ages of 40 and 49 comprise the third-largest group, with 69 cases or 15% of the state's total.

There have been only four cases among children age 9 and under, who comprise .9% of the state's total, and seven among young people ages 10 to 19, comprising 1.5%.

There have been 22 cases involving patients older than 80, comprising 4.8% of the state's total, the data say.

In terms of gender, men make up 52.6% of the state's cases, while women comprise 45.9%. The state has no gender to report for seven of the cases.

The VDH also included information about patients' race, but it is mostly incomplete.

The state does not have that information on 60.9% of the cases confirmed thus far. Among the remaining cases, whites account for 121 cases, or 26.9%, while blacks make up 32 cases, or 7%, the data says.

The overall number of cases in Northern Virginia rose to 225 on Thursday, up 35 from Wednesday.

They include 14 cases in Alexandria, 54 cases in Arlington, three cases in the City of Manassas, one case in Fairfax City, 79 cases in Fairfax County, one case in Fauquier County, 28 cases in Loudoun County, 36 cases in Prince William County, two cases in Spotsylvania and seven cases in Stafford.

Wednesday, March 25: Virginia reports 101 new COVID-19 cases. New totals: 391 statewide, 32 in Prince William, 2 in City of Manassas

Virginia reported 101 new COVID-19 cases on Wednesday for a new total of 391 across the state, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Prince William County saw its numbers jump from 23 to 32, up 9. The City of Manassas now has two confirmed cases, the VDH reports.

There were a total of 190 cases in Northern Virginia counties as of Wednesday, March 25, up 51 from Tuesday.

They included nine cases in Alexandria, 46 in Arlington County, 76 in Fairfax County, 20 in Loudoun County, two in the City of Manassas, 32 in Prince William County, three in Spotsylvania County and six in Stafford County.

Tuesday, March 24: Virginia reports 290 COVID-19 cases, up 36 from Monday. Prince William at 23, up 5 

Virginia reported 36 more cases of COVID-19 Tuesday for a new total of 290, while deaths in the commonwealth climbed to seven, an increase of one from Monday. 

The cases reported in Prince William County rose to 23 as of Tuesday, March 24, an increase of five from Monday, according to the latest figures from the Virginia Department of Health.

A Prince William County fourth-grader and their parent have tested positive for COVID-19, according to emails sent to Prince William County students Sunday.

There were a total of 139 cases in Northern Virginia counties as of Tuesday, March 23. They included eight cases in Alexandria, 36 in Arlington County, 46 in Fairfax County, 18 in Loudoun County, 23 in Prince William County, two in Spotsylvania County and six in Stafford County.

Monday, March 23: Gov. Northam closes all schools for the year, some 'non-essential businesses' for 30 days

Gov. Ralph Northam on Monday announced that all Virginia public schools would remain closed for the rest of the year and that certain "non-essential businesses" would be ordered to shutter as of midnight Tuesday.

Northam made the announcement during his 2 p.m. press conference in Richmond, which was held two hours after the Virginia Department of Health released the state's latest COVID-19 statistics. As of noon Monday, Virginia reported 254 cases of COVID-19 and six deaths due to the coronavirus, which Northam said is continuing to spread in Virginia.

Northam said that only "essential businesses," a designation that includes grocery stores, pharmacies, restaurants (for carry-out or delivery orders only), construction supply stores and even ABC stores, could remain open but would be required to maintain social distancing and adhere to stricter cleaning rules.

Certain businesses considered "recreational" would be ordered closed, including bowling alleys, theaters and racetracks. Personal care outlets such as barber shops, spas and massage parlors would also be ordered closed. Non-essential stores and businesses that remain open must adhere to a 10-patron or fewer rule to remain open. The order would be in place for 30 days, Northam said.

Schools would receive guidance Tuesday from the state department of education regarding how schools should ensure they deliver instruction for the remaining weeks of the school year "and to make sure students are served equitably," Northam said.

"We do not make these decisions lightly," Northam said, regarding the closures. "But Virginia is one of the country's largest and most diverse states, and we must act. ... The point is to limit the places where people gather in groups."

While Northam's order will close public and private schools, it will allow day care centers and schools that are used as day care centers to remain open to care for children of essential workers, including health care workers, those who work in grocery stores and pharmacies and those involved in making or delivering essential supplies.

Northam said the state likely has 80,000 children under the age of 12 whose parents work in health care.

"We're calling on local communities and child care providers and public schools to rally together to provide child care for our essential personnel ... while following strict protocols to keep our children safe," Northam said.

All of Virginia's public school divisions are handing out food to students during the school closures. More information about school food distribution efforts can be obtained by texting FOOD or COMIDA to 877877, Northam said.

Northam acknowledged the financial impact of such steps but said more must be done to stop the spread of the coronavirus to keep the state's hospitals and health care providers from being overwhelmed.

"We are moving into a period of sacrifice, most of us have already begun to experience this.... there is more ahead and things are changing fast," Northam said. "Today, thousands and thousands of people are without work in our commonwealth; 40,000 people filed for unemployment last week. That number will go up."

Monday, March 23: Virginia reports 254 COVID-19 cases, 6 deaths. Prince William holds steady at 18 

Virginia reported 35 more cases of COVID-19 Monday for a new total of 254, while deaths in the commonwealth attributed to the virus rose to six.

The cases reported in Prince William County remained at 18, as of Monday, March 23, according to the latest figures from the Virginia Department of Health.

The additional deaths reported late Sunday night involved three women in their 80s. One lived in a long-term care facility, according to officials with the department of health's Peninsula District.

“It is with deep sadness that we announce three additional victims of COVID-19. We at VDH express our condolences to those families,” said Peninsula Acting Health Director Dr. Steve Julian.

“Increased public cooperation with the publicized guidelines that lessen the spread of the disease will reduce the incidence of deaths related to COVID-19," he added.

All three women died of respiratory failure linked to COVID-19. They were residents of James City County, Newport News and Williamsburg, the Peninsula Health District said.

There were a total of 124 cases in Northern Virginia counties as of Monday, March 23. They included six cases in Alexandria, 34 in Arlington County, 43 in Fairfax County, 15 in Loudoun County, 18 in Prince William County, two in Spotsylvania County and six in Stafford County.

Sunday, March 22: As state COVID-19 cases rise to 219, including 18 in PWC, Northam urges residents to 'please stay home.'

Gov. Ralph Northam stressed Sunday that the coronavirus will have long-term impacts on Virginia and its economy after state officials announced 67 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state's new total to 219.

Prince William County had 18 cases as of Sunday, March 22, up four from Saturday, March 21, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

"This is not a matter of weeks, this is a matter of months," Northam said of the crisis during his 11 a.m. Sunday briefing in Richmond.

When asked by a reporter about the pandemic's affects on the state's economy, Northam said, "There's no question that this will have long-term impacts on our economy and we're doing everything we can to prepare Virginians for that."

Virginia lost a third person to COVID-19 on Saturday night.

A Fairfax County man in his 60s succumbed to respiratory failure in connection with the disease, the VDH said in a press release.

On Sunday, Northam announced new efforts to help Virginia's healthcare workers and hospitals acquire needed personal protective equipment, including gloves, gowns and face masks as well as respirators.

Northam also said he expects to make an announcement on Monday about whether mandated school closures would be extended during the ongoing health crisis.

The governor had already mandated last week that all public and private schools close for two weeks, shuttering them through Friday, March 27.

Most Northern Virginia school divisions, including Prince William County's, have already closed schools through Monday, April 13. 

Northern Virginia counties account for 102 cases of COVID-19, nearly half of the state's total. As of Sunday, March 22, there were five cases in Alexandria, 26 cases in Arlington County, 31 cases in Fairfax County, 15 cases in Loudoun County, 18 cases in Prince William County, two cases in Spotsylvania County and five cases in Stafford County.

State Epidemiologist Lilian Peake said the number of confirmed cases would continue to rise as more testing is conducted across the state.

Prince William County is no longer providing detailed information about its new cases, which have ticked up steadily over the past two weeks.

"We know the virus is in our community. In Northern Virginia there are pockets of community transmission," Dr. Alison Ansher, director of the Prince William Health District, said in an email Saturday.

Given the community transmission, Ansher stressed that residents continue to follow CDC advice for combatting the spread of the virus, including frequently washing hands and disinfecting commonly touched surfaces.

It's been 15 days since Virginia reported its first confirmed case of the coronavirus, which involved a Marine stationed at Marine Corps Base Quantico who tested positive on Saturday, March 7, after returning from an official trip to Ethiopia.

During the 11 a.m. Sunday briefing in Richmond, Peake said most of the new test results came from private labs -- an indication that more tests are being conducted across the state. 

The state reported 3,337 tests for the coronavirus as of 5 p.m. Saturday. A total of 32 people have been hospitalized due to the virus, according the latest VDH report.

Officials: "Some" COVID-19 cases in Virginia nursing homes

Some of Virginia's cases of COVID-19 have been detected in nursing homes, although state officials provided no details Sunday about those patients or nursing homes where they reside, citing privacy concerns.

Peake said health department officials are analyzing the numbers and will release more information when they determine how that can be done without "incidentally identifying an individual."

Official: No inmates yet tested in Virginia's jails, prisons

Virginia has yet to have a confirmed coronavirus case in one of its more than 60 jails and prisons across the state, but it also has not conducted any tests among those who are incarcerated, Virginia Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security Brian Moran said Sunday in response to questions from reporters.

Moran was first asked whether there are any COVID-19 cases among Virginia's jailed population, to which he said: "No, as of this moment, there are no positive tests in our corrections facilities. ... We are being as transparent as possible."

When pressed by another reporter about whether any inmates had been tested, Moran said it has been difficult to amass information from all of Virginia's jails and sheriff's offices.

He then added: "I'm not aware of any [inmates] that have been tested. Some have been presented for testing but have not met the guidelines set by the Virginia Department of Health."

Moran went on to say that Virginia has taken "extraordinary steps" to free up space in its jails to allow for isolation areas in case any inmates test positive for COVID-19 in the coming days and weeks.

Moran said he has asked the state parole board to consider as soon as possible the cases of inmates older than 60 who are eligible for parole.

The state already has "geriatric release" for eligible inmates 65 and older, he noted.

Beyond that, the state has suspended inmate transfers from jails to prisons in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic and has encouraged local jails to use home-monitoring and other alternatives to incarceration whenever possible to "reduce the spread of the virus," Moran said.

Prince William Commonwealth's Attorney Amy Ashworth announced Friday, March 20, that such strategies are being pursued at the county's adult detention center.

Northam has been holding press briefings everyday at 11 a.m. for the last week. On Monday, March 23, the briefings will move to 2 p.m., Northam said.

On Sunday, Northam continued to stress the need for social distancing. He called for Virginians to stay home as much as possible during the ongoing pandemic.

"Do not go into crowds. Do not have gatherings," Northam said, adding: "Social distancing does not mean congregating on a local beach. This is not a holiday. This is not a vacation. Please stay home."

Saturday, March 21: Virginia COVID-19 cases rise to 152, up 38 from Friday. Prince William at 14, up 2

Virginia officials Saturday morning reported 152 confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the commonwealth, an increase of 38 cases in the last 24 hours.

Prince William County's number of coronavirus cases stands at 14, up two from Friday, March 20.

The state's new total includes 80 in the following Northern Virginia localities: the City of Alexandria has five cases, Arlington County has 22 cases, Fairfax County has 22 cases, Loudoun County has 14 cases, Prince William has 14 cases, Spotsylvania County has one case and Stafford County has two cases. 

During his 11 a.m. press briefing, Gov. Ralph Northam and other state officials announced that COVID-19 testing protocols have been adjusted to prioritize health care workers, people who have had close contact with confirmed cases and existing “clusters” of COVID-19 around the state.

State officials noted two clusters around Richmond and one in James City County earlier this week but mentioned no new clusters as of Saturday, March 21. 

A “cluster” is defined as two or more cases linked to a common source.

Friday, March 20: Prince William's COVID-19 cases rise to 12, while Virginia adds 20 for a total of 114

Virginia reported 20 new confirmed cases of the coronavirus Friday, bringing the state’s new total to 114. Prince William saw one new case, bringing the local total to 12, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

During his 11 a.m. press briefing, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam again stressed the need for social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19 and said he is "heartened" to see many residents and businesses complying with the mandate.

But Northam also said localities have the authority to enforce the rule, which was formally issued in an emergency order on Tuesday, March 17.

"We’re hearing reports of some businesses being noncompliant. Our localities have the authority to enforce the 10-person limit at restaurants, theaters and fitness centers. I fully expect them to use it when needed," Northam said.

Every Virginia health district region is now reporting at least one confirmed case of COVID-19, including the southwest, which had not yet had a confirmed case before Friday.

Across Virginia, 25 localities are reporting at least one case. James City County, in the Peninsula area around Williamsburg, has the highest number, at 19. That’s followed by Arlington County, which reported 17 cases as of Friday.

In Northern Virginia, there were 57 reported cases as of Friday, March 20, including 17 in Arlington County, 16 in Fairfax County, 12 in Prince William County, nine in Loudoun County, two in Stafford County and one in Spotsylvania County.

More detailed information about the Prince William County cases had not yet been released as of noon on Friday, March 20. Prince William Health District Director Dr. Alison Ansher has not yet responded to emailed requests for comment about the last several coronavirus cases reported in the county. 

Prince William saw its numbers more than double on Thursday, rising from four to 11.

During the Friday press briefing, Virginia Health Commissioner Dr. Norman Oliver said the state's capacity of coronavirus tests exceeded 1,000 as of midday Friday but is still limited due to a lack of testing supplies.

Dr. Denise Toney, director of Virginia’s Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services, said the state lab does not currently have a backlog of tests waiting to be processed, but is experiencing a shortage of testing reagents.

Oliver noted that the cases across the U.S. numbered more than 13,000 on Friday. There have so far been 196 deaths across the country. Virginia had 20 people hospitalized with the virus and two deaths as of Friday, the same number of deaths the VDH reported on Tuesday, March 17.

“We do not have a medicine for COVID 19. We do not have a vaccine,” Oliver said. “The only thing we have to prevent this disease is social distancing, so we all need to do that.”

In response to a question about the role of the Virginia National Guard, Northam said he had not yet decided whether to mobilize any units.

“I would describe the National Guard as being on standby right now,” Northam said.

Northam acknowledged that the past few days have been scary and stressful for Virginians, and he said he realizes that many have already lost their jobs due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Tens of thousands of Virginians have already applied for unemployment benefits in the past few days, said Virginia’s Chief Workforce Development Advisor Megan Healy.

Healy said the state is increasing capacity at the employment commission in hopes of speeding up the process of filing for benefits. Among other things, the commission has increased its server capacity and added a new call center, Healy said.

The state has also waived its waiting requirement to receive benefits and has suspended the rules around applying for at least three jobs a week to continue receiving unemployment checks. 

Checks should be able to go out within a week or so of filing, Healy said.

Healy also stressed that anyone who thinks they might be eligible for unemployment benefits should apply, since the rules around them have been changing daily. 

“We want everyone to apply.  We’re going to keep that [application] data, so if the rules change, we can go back and start issuing those checks, Healy said.

Thursday, March 19: Prince William coronavirus cases more than double, while Virginia cases rise to 94

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases rose to 11 in Prince William County as of Thursday, more than doubling from four on Wednesday.

According to the Virginia Department of Health, only two cases in Prince William are travel related and one was transmitted from another case.

Eight, however, are from an unknown origin, the VDH data say.

Statewide, the total number of confirmed coronavirus cases rose to 94 on Thursday, up 17 from Wednesday’s total of 77.

There were a total of 55 cases across Northern Virginia, including 17 in Arlington, 16 in Fairfax, 11 in Prince William, five in Loudoun, four in Alexandria and two in Stafford.

A total of 1,923 people have been tested for the virus with 19 people hospitalized, according to VDH.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced measures limiting gathering of more than 10 people on Monday to combat the spread of the virus. 

The Northam administration is encouraging high-risk Virginians, those with underlying health conditions or who are over age 65, to self-quarantine. 

Thursday, March 19: Virginia's number of confirmed coronavirus cases rose to 77 on Wednesday, up 10 from the day before, and the state is contending with three "outbreaks" of COVID-19, including one in James City County and two in Richmond.

Gov. Ralph Northam updated the numbers at 11 a.m. Wednesday, March 18, during a press conference with other state officials in Richmond.

The number of cases in Prince William County remained at four, the same number reported on Tuesday, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Outbreaks are defined as "two or more cases that ... can be traced to a common exposure," State Health Commissioner Norman Oliver said.

James City County now has 17 cases of COVID-19, Oliver said.

Four Richmond residents had tested positive for COVID-19 as of Wednesday morning. They are the first positive cases in the city limits, according to a report in the Richmond-Times Dispatch.

All of the Richmond cases involve men, two in their 20s and two in their 30s, who had recently traveled outside of the state. Three were in one group, Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney said during a Wednesday morning press conference, according to the RTD report. 

The fourth man traveled to New York and had contact with someone who tested positive. All four are in self-isolation at home. One had been hospitalized, Stoney said.

State officials are still awaiting the results of at least 65 COVID-19 tests, not including those being processed by private labs, officials said.

Dr. Daniel Carey, Virginia's secretary of health and human resources, shared information regarding Virginia's supply of ventilators and other hospital equipment, which has become a nationwide concern during the coronavirus pandemic.

Carey said there are "nearly 2,000" intensive care unit beds with "respiratory support equipment" across the state, as well as 400 additional units in state reserves.

Beyond that, there are strategic national stockpiles, and health care providers are working with private providers to supplement those assets, Carey said.

Tuesday, March 17: Gov. Ralph Northam orders 10-patron limit as cases rise to 67 across Virginia 

Gov. Ralph Northam issued an order Tuesday that allows law enforcement to enforce a ban that prohibits more than 10 patrons in places such as restaurants, fitness centers and theaters.

Northam and State Health Commissioner Norman Oliver issued a public health emergency order to reduce the spread of the new coronavirus, or COVID-19.

“I hope that everyone will have the common sense to stay home tonight and in the days ahead,” Northam said. “This order will ensure that state and local officials have the tools they need to keep people safe.”

All Virginians should increase social distancing, avoiding gatherings of more than 10 people, the state said. This follows federal guidelines announced Monday.

At a press conference earlier Tuesday Oliver announced that two people have died from the disease and 67 people are confirmed to have it, including one patient who is currently in a long-term care facility — which he said was “very concerning.”

Oliver said about 48 tests are currently pending. The first confirmed case was announced on March 7.

According to the Virginia Department of Health, the potential public health threat posed by COVID-19 is high but the individual risk is dependent upon exposure. People over the age of 65 and those with underlying health conditions were urged to self-quarantine due to elevated vulnerability to the disease.

Oliver said that there are currently 300 to 400 COVID-19 testing kits in the commonwealth, with more on order.

“I don’t want you to think that you are just getting a cold,” Oliver said. “This is a serious, serious pandemic and social distancing is, therefore, something we should do and take seriously, for ourselves, for our loved ones, and for our community.”

Oliver also said there are federal plans to launch automated test sites and drive-through testing centers nationwide in the areas that have been hit the hardest by the disease.

Sentara Healthcare has opened three drive-through testing centers in Hampton Roads for those who are at the highest risk for the disease.

Northam has also rolled out new measures to support workers across the state that are being affected by closures due to the coronavirus, including eliminating the wait for unemployment benefits and increased eligibility for unemployment status.

Workers may be able to qualify for unemployment if their employer slows or ceases operations due to the disease; if they have been issued a notice to self-quarantine by a medical or public health official but are not receiving sick pay or medical leave; or if they are not receiving paid medical leave while staying home to take care of sick family members.

The one-week unpaid waiting period was waived for benefits, and unemployment funds are available through the Virginia Employment Commission, Northam said.

The state ordered all 75 offices of the Department of Motor Vehicles to close, in addition to urging the Supreme Court of Virginia to close all courts until April 6 for non-emergency or non-essential court proceedings.

Online services are still available, the governor said, and 60-day extensions have been granted for expired licenses and registrations.

The State Corporation Commission also issued an order to suspend utility service disconnections for the next 60 days in order to provide relief for those financially impacted by COVID-19.

“Together we will get through this and we will be a better Virginia,” Northam said. “Every single one of us has a personal responsibility in this situation, every one of us has a role in being part of the solution.”

The Virginia Department of Health currently has a 24-hour Coronavirus information hotline that can be reached at 877-ASK-VDH3 or 877-275-8343 for questions about the disease.

 

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(1) comment

JBH

"Democratic hoax"? Wake up, Virginia...lies are NOT beneficial to any of us.

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