Fauquier County generic

Town of Warrenton announces Thanksgiving holiday refuse schedule 

The Town of Warrenton has announced the following refuse collection schedule for the week of Thanksgiving:  

Monday, Nov. 23, regular refuse collection 

Tuesday, Nov. 24, regular refuse collection 

Wednesday, Nov. 25, recycling collection (cardboard, newspaper and recycle bags) 

Thursday, Nov. 26, no refuse collection 

Friday, Nov. 27, no refuse collection 

 

Warrenton United Methodist Church hosts drive-thru nativity 

Warrenton United Methodist Church invites the community to a drive-thru Christmas story. 

The public is invited to drive through the nativity scene to enjoy a show of lights and music and enjoy scenes leading to the manger.  

The nativity scene will be held Dec. 20-24, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the church, 341 Church St., Warrenton. The event is free. 

The church will also hold a bonfire worship service at 7:30 p.m. on Christmas eve. 

 

No Kid Hungry Virginia Grants $41,500 to Fauquier County Public Schools to support free meals during pandemic 

Fauquier County Public Schools recently received $41,592 from No Kid Hungry Virginia to strengthen the division’s child nutrition programs during the COVID-19 pandemic and in its aftermath.  

The funding will support the purchase and retrofitting of a van for meal deliveries and the expansion of school nutrition programs. 

Hunger in Virginia and across the country is growing because of the pandemic’s impact on the economy. Experts estimate one in four children nationwide could face food insecurity this year, up from one in seven before the pandemic occurred. A new analysis from The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities finds that Black and Latino households are more than twice as likely as white households to report that their household didn’t get enough to eat. 

Programs managed by school divisions and community organizations have been a critical tool to address hunger in Virginia’s communities. Teams are offering a variety of food distribution models to help safely connect kids with meals, including “Grab and Go” service at schools and food delivery along bus routes. 

To help protect staff and kids during the pandemic, nutrition departments have purchased new equipment to transport meals and personal protective supplies that have put strains on operating budgets. 

“We continue to be thankful for the compassionate and dedicated school nutrition teams across the state who are stepping up to feed students during this crisis,” said Sarah Steely, associate director of No Kid Hungry Virginia, a campaign of Share Our Strength. “We expect the need for meals to continue and we’re here to help divisions navigate the challenges of feeding the community during the pandemic.” 

Since schools first closed in March, No Kid Hungry has provided more than $1.5 million in grants to help Virginia school divisions and community organizations adapt and expand their programs to meet increased need across the state. 

Most divisions will continue to offer free meals to youth 18 and under for the entire school year. Families are encouraged to check with their local school division for details.  

Steely added, “The No. 1 way families can support school meal programs is to participate. School meals are for everyone and they are not in short supply. Higher participation helps departments balance their budgets and compensate for the added costs of adapting these programs to safely reach kids and families during the pandemic. Eating school meals also helps create a sense of normalcy as students navigate in-person and virtual learning options.” 

Visit state.nokidhungry.org/virginia for more information about No Kid Hungry Virginia’s work. 

 

Private-public partnerships benefit preschool children 

The Virginia Preschool Initiative, a public preschool program for at-risk 4-year-olds, is currently in its sixth year of operation in Fauquier County. Since its inception, VPI has benefited from the generosity of several community organizations that have provided donations and or grants to the program, the school division said in a news release. The private-public partnerships that have developed in the county have provided preschoolers with much-needed supplies and nutrition, the news release. A long-time supporter of VPI, Saint James’ Episcopal Church & School in Warrenton, recently donated a number of items for use by the VPI program, including boxes of tissues, masks and hand sanitizer. These donations materialized from Saint James’ Episcopal School’s monthly altruistic project whereby school children and their families donate requested items, according to the news release. 

Recognizing that children beyond preschool may also be in need this school year, Jennifer Taylor, Director of Family Ministries at Saint James’, reached out to FRESH supervisor Kristen McAuliffe to identify additional ways the school might help. In collaboration with the FRESH Program, a system was created where students in Mrs. Stitely’s fourth-grade class fulfill supply requests from teachers throughout the county. 

“Service to others is a big part of our Episcopal identity, and I want each student to know they can make a difference in our community regardless of their age. The students have taken such pride in this project and are pleased to know they are helping others,” Taylor said in the news release  

Also lending a helping hand is A Little Heart, a 501(c)(3) organization in The Plains, and Highland School in Warrenton, the news release said. Together they have continued to provide and pack hundreds of snow day kits. Used during the school year, when there is a possibility of a snow day, the kits are typically sent home with children who may not have enough to eat. Each snow day kit provides a day’s worth of food and includes a breakfast item, a lunch item, fruit, a snack and a dinner item, all in a resealable storage bag. 

While the Fauquier School Nutrition Department provides meals to families in need, numbers can vary drastically from week to week, complicating the planning. The availability of snow day kits guarantees that no one leaves a distribution site without food for their children, according to the school division news release. 

In October, during their Community Time curriculum, Highland's Class of 2024 learned about the mission and efforts of Fauquier FRESH and assembled snow day kits with supplies provided by A Little Heart charity. 

“We're so grateful for the opportunity to engage our students in this vital community effort to provide meals to other students and families in our area,” Megan Catalfamo, Leadership Coordinator for Highland School, said in the news release 

The FRESH team is actively seeking individuals and local nonprofits interested in collaborating to help families in need. To donate or join the FRESH team in helping with a future project, please contact Kristen McAuliffe at kmcauliffe@fcps1.org. 

 

Wakefield teacher recognized by VFW 

Peter Findler, Wakefield School social studies department chair and upper school teacher, was recently awarded the Veterans of Foreign Wars Smart-Maher Citizenship Education Teacher of the Year by VFW Post 9835 in Warrenton. This award qualifies his entry into a District VFW level award competition which could lead to a State VFW level.  

“This recognition comes as no surprise to those that know Mr. Findler,” a post on Wakefield School’s Facebook page. “When he isn’t teaching Upper School History, spending time with his advisory, or helping to guide our Wakefield Upper School Community Council, he takes on the role of a student. Mr. Findler is currently enrolled at The Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, earning an M.Ed. in Curriculum & Instruction.” 

Findler also started a nonprofit, The 9:57 Project, described as a "mission-based education program that engages students and military veterans in a study of the legacy of September 11, 2001, leading students to embrace lives of character and service.” The nonprofit connects schools and veterans to share uplifting stories of 9/11 as well as other post-9/11 combat stories of bravery and resilience. Most recently, The 9:57 Project collaborated with Wakefield School to connect veterans with upper and middle School students on Veterans Day. 

Community invited to judge PEC annual photo contest finalists 

Finalists in the Piedmont Environmental Council’s 11th annual photo contest were announced this week and now through Sunday, Nov. 22, community members are invited to view the images and vote for their favorites to win. Photos can be viewed, and votes placed at pecva.org/photovote 

PEC staff and local photographers have chosen five finalists for each of four categories: Beautiful Landscapes and Streetscapes, Native Plants and Wildlife, and Wonderful Waters, and Youth. All finalists will receive a one-year PEC membership and have their work featured in PEC’s upcoming online and/or print publications. 

Winners in each adult category will receive a $75 gift certificate to a nearby restaurant participating in PEC’s “Buy Fresh Buy Local” program. The youth category winner will receive their choice of a $75 iTunes, Google Play, or Amazon gift card. 

“We were thrilled at the number of stunning images submitted to this year’s contest. They help us tell important stories and connect people with this beautiful place in new and exciting ways. Thank you to everyone who submitted a photo,” said Hugh Kenny, PEC communications fellow and contest coordinator. 

 

Community invited to judge PEC annual photo contest finalists 

Finalists in the Piedmont Environmental Council’s 11th annual photo contest were announced this week and now through Sunday, Nov. 22, community members are invited to view the images and vote for their favorites to win. Photos can be viewed, and votes placed at pecva.org/photovote 

PEC staff and local photographers have chosen five finalists for each of four categories: Beautiful Landscapes and Streetscapes, Native Plants and Wildlife, and Wonderful Waters, and Youth. All finalists will receive a one-year PEC membership and have their work featured in PEC’s upcoming online and/or print publications. 

Winners in each adult category will receive a $75 gift certificate to a nearby restaurant participating in PEC’s “Buy Fresh Buy Local” program. The youth category winner will receive their choice of a $75 iTunes, Google Play, or Amazon gift card. 

“We were thrilled at the number of stunning images submitted to this year’s contest. They help us tell important stories and connect people with this beautiful place in new and exciting ways. Thank you to everyone who submitted a photo,” said Hugh Kenny, PEC communications fellow and contest coordinator. 

 

 

Fauquier and Rappahannock master gardener training goes virtual, mostly 

Virginia Cooperative Extension is recruiting a new cadre of volunteers to participate in the Extension Master Gardener Training for 2021. If you have cultivated your love of gardening during the pandemic or are looking for ways to serve and engage with the community, this 15-week training starting in January may be for you. 

The training will be held primarily on Zoom on Tuesdays from 9 to 10:30 a.m. starting Jan. 12 and running until approximately April 27, depending on weather conditions. The training will include self-paced virtual modules, videos and quizzes. Participants will also have four in-person outdoor labs on Tuesday mornings in Marshall and Warrenton. The class will be managed using the online platform Canvas. 

VCE will hold an information session for individuals to learn more about the training, the application process, and opportunities for volunteering with the Master Gardener program on Zoom on Dec.  15 both at 9 a.m. To register, visit https://virginiatech.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAudeqhqToiGdBcea6cMZit6Jj3TZKizqGy 

The fee for the training is $250. More information about the complete application process, and scholarship opportunities can be found here at ://drive.google.com/file/d/1d4iN-T0EkdkEvgqVPwY7nuVoCw0lshvr/view. The application deadline is Dec. 16. The application can be found at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1KNdk7UFId57c1D7-j7fb1NVqqhU0xpHM/view. 

The application can be returned by email to Tim Ohlwiler at tohlwile@vt.edu or dropped off or mailed to the Extension Office at 24 Pelham St., in Warrenton.  

 

Funding available to retrain the unemployed  

“If you have lost your job, or seen a reduction in your hours and paycheck, Virginia’s community colleges want to help you,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of the Virginia Community College System said in a news release.  

The new Re-Employing Virginians (REV) initiative will provide scholarships to eligible individuals to enroll in a workforce or community college program in five essential industries: health care, information technology, skilled trades, public safety and early childhood education.  

“Virginians who have been furloughed, had hours reduced, or lost a job because of the pandemic are struggling and wondering what the future holds,” Gov. Ralph Northam said in the news release. “Investing in programs that help people develop skills in high-demand fields is a win for workers, employers, and our economy. As we focus on recovering from the impacts of the global pandemic, the new REV initiative will give Virginians the resources they need to get back on their feet and help ensure that our Commonwealth emerges from this public health crisis even stronger than we were before.”  

The initiative will provide one-time REV scholarships of $3,000 to register in a qualifying full-time workforce program and $1,500 to register part-time or in a short-term, noncredit training program. The Virginia Community College System and Northern Virginia and Hampton Roads Local Workforce Development Areas will administer the CARES Act funding for the REV initiative, with $27 million allocated to VCCS for statewide programs and $3 million for the two workforce areas.   

There is an enrollment deadline of Dec. 14, although classes may begin in the spring semester. Visit www.lfcc.edu/rev to learn more.  

 

LFCC’s 50th anniversary celebrated with ribbon cutting 

It was only fitting that Professor Frank Borleske was the one wielding the extra-large scissors when the ribbon was cut in honor of LFCC’s 50th anniversary on Tuesday, Nov. 10. 

The math professor is the only current faculty member who has worked at the college since it first opened its doors to students on Sept. 28, 1970, according to an LFCC news release. 

“I was there at the dedication ceremony, Oct. 17, 1970, in the old student lounge,” Borleske said in the news release. “It was an absolutely beautiful day. The mountains were very clear. Gov. Mills Godwin spoke about the advantage of having a community college, how it would change lives in this area.” 

Godwin also said the mission of the community college was to “educate the young men and women who never thought they would have a chance to go on to college. To many of them, it must seem like a miracle.” 

In its 50-year history, LFCC has enrolled more than 400,000 credit and workforce students and presented more than 23,000 with degrees or certificates, President Kim Blosser said during the ribbon-cutting ceremony, which was organized by the Luray-Page County Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Center and the Top of Virginia Regional Chamber. Shenandoah County Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Sharon Baroncelli was also in attendance. 

Each year, LFCC serves about 20,000 students, the news release said. 

“Imagine what it would be like if we had never been built,” Blosser said. “My hope for our next 50 years is that it doesn’t take a miracle for so many of our students to earn their credentials or degrees. We have accomplished a great deal in the first 50 years, and we’re looking forward to even greater achievements in the next 50.” 

Middletown Mayor Charles Harbaugh IV, an LFCC alumnus and adjunct professor, said any town would love to have a community college in its midst. 

“I have had many friends and family members who have come through the community college, mainly at the Luray-Page County Center,” said Page County Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Center President Regina Hilliard. “May your work continue to bring joy.” 

Half of her family has attended LFCC, said Top of Virginia Regional Chamber CEO Cynthia Schneider. Her youngest daughter’s future was turned around by attending LFCC, and she is now studying for her master’s degree. 

Coming to LFCC “was a life-changing time for her,” Schneider said. “This nurturing environment is a launch pad for success.” 

Learn more about LFCC’s history and view a timeline at www.lfcc.edu/50.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.