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Alt-Right 'Identity Dixie' fliers posted in Warrenton ahead of anti-white supremacy march

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Dozens of fliers associated with the self-described “southern nationalist” and “alt-right” group Identity Dixie were found tacked to utility poles throughout Old Town Warrenton Saturday, hours before the participants of an anti-white supremacy march were scheduled to march through the area.

The fliers included the slogans “HONOR YOUR HISTORY,” under drawings of Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson; and “WE HAVE THE RIGHT TO EXIST,” under a black-and-white photo of white children saluting the American flag. The website listed on the fliers promotes racist, derogatory and homophobic views in its posts.

The fliers were discovered by a few Old Town Warrenton residents at about 9 a.m. Saturday morning.

Carter Nevill said he spent about two hours removing the signs after a friend called to tell him about one posted to a light pole outside her home.

“When I heard that, I made it my mission to find every single one of them and remove them,” Nevill said.

The posters were found on Falmouth, Main and Lee streets. In all, Nevill said he and other residents removed between 60 and 75 posters.

Because it rained Friday night and the fliers were mostly dry, it is believed they were posted early Saturday morning, Nevill said.

Deputy Police Chief Gary Dillon said an investigation has been opened. But it’s not clear yet if there was any violation of Virginia law in connection with the posters.

“The Warrenton Police Department was not initially notified of these posters,” Dillon said. “Once notified, we began an investigation into this matter. Any posters that are discovered will be taken down in accordance with Town ordinance. Any charges, if appropriate, will be forthcoming.”

Nevill, a lifelong resident of Warrenton, said he’d never seen such fliers posted in Warrenton. He said he assumed they were placed in response to the March to Confront White Supremacy.

The marchers arrived in Fauquier County on Saturday and marched to Gainesville Sunday. Several Warrenton and Fauquier County residents supported the march by joining the participants on U.S. 29 and by providing lunch and dinner for the marchers on Sunday.  

But Nevill said he felt certain the fliers were posted to send a different message.

“It was no accident that they appeared on the morning the march came through here,” Nevill said of the posters. “This was designed to send a public message against the march … to point out [the marchers] are a threat to our community.”

Nevill said he’d never heard of the group Indentity Dixie before finding the posters. The group’s website states they are “southern nationalist and alt-right” group whose goal is to “achieve the independence of the Dixieland.”

“Your Southern ancestors’ memorials and flags are being defiled and dishonored? Are you just going to stand on the sideline and do nothing? If you’ve had enough, then you’re in the right place and have the right (Southern) stuff,” the website states.

The Rev. Stephen A. Green, senior pastor of Heard AME Church in Roselle, New Jersey, said the fliers are not the first hostile response the marchers have encountered on their 118-mile journey from Charlottesville to Washington, D.C.

“It’s been confirmed to us that folks have been passing out fliers and leaflets supporting white supremacy and the KKK and also threats on social media,” Green said. “Of course, we are cognizant of them but we are not deterred because of those comments and remarks.”

Green said the marchers have also received “an outpouring of love and support from folks” but noted: “What we’re doing here is pushing the envelope. That’s allowed the true essence of people’s emotions to come out and be on public display.”

Green said there are many examples of systemic white supremacy that might not be immediately perceived as such, including the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, a mostly minority community, and the disproportionate representation of people of color incarcerated by the nation’s criminal justice system.

“I think it shows there’s still a rationale and a reason why this nation has to come to grips with its original sin,” Green said. “It shows the roots of white supremacy that is embedded in this nation’s culture.”

Nevill, who is not connected with the march, said the fliers appear to try to appeal to “middle of the road people” by mentioning words like “heritage” and “history” without disclosing the group’s darker goals.

“They’re casting a wide net to bring in people who might otherwise despise them to their side,” he said.

This is a developing story. Stay with Fauquier Times for updates. Reach the Fauquier Times at news@fauquier.com.

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(13) comments

Tizok

"Honor Your History"...."We Have a Right to Exist". It's a shame that people can stlll have such hateful opinions in the 21st century- good thing the police are looking into this as only African, Hispanic and Asian Americans have the right to organize as a people. The white man alone does not have this right as he does not exist being solely a social construct. NO WHITE MAN, YOUR HISTORY IS EVIL and YOU DO NOT HAVE A RIGHT TO EXIST.

oldragmtn

Don't make this a bigger deal then it should be! It is freedom of speech.I know no law on the books that makes this illegal-

Ars Longa

True, it is freedom of speech. But does that mean we just let it be? Imagine the same situation, but instead with MS13 posting. Or the New Black Panther Party? Would we not have a right to be alarmed at this speech? Would we be wrong in thinking that it might pose a threat to our community? Should we just accept it and let it be? Or should we take action?

No one is denying the right of the poster to their right speech. But we as a community have an equal right to respond to that speech with our own. And when it is associated with a known hate group that is a direct threat to our values, we have no choice but to stand fast to halt it.

sshrader

It is freedom of speech but to not make a big deal of this is to tell all Fauquier residents and visitors that are Black, Hispanic, Latino, etc. that hate is acceptable here and that would be very harmful to our community.
I wonder how many of these proud "white" people actually know their full ethnic background.

Virtus

By misidentifying Gen. Lee, it appears that his eradication has come to Warrenton.

Virtus

FYI - the gentleman on the right of President Washington is General Robert E. Lee.

sshrader

A year ago I never would have guessed that this kind of hate could still be so prevalent. It is terrible that it has too be this in our face for many of us to finally take action on an issue that we all have known is far from being fixed.

mandinka

Race relations have been improving every year since 1970 UNTIL Barak Obama was elected. He single handedly returned relations to the pre 1960" with constant message of hate and quotas

sshrader

Look a little deeper than some easy superficial blame game. When Obama was elected there was a hope and thought that we had come so far and overcome so much to finally have a black man as President. Many people could not understand that black Americans were still facing the same systemic issues that prevent equality- criminal injustice, unequal education and employment opportunities, unfair distribution of wealth. These issues did not just disappear yet many white Americans could not understand and certainly could not relate to the dissatisfaction and injustice of everyday life for many black Americans. Top that off with the growing white supremacy movement, a childish and insecure backlash to having a black man as President, and the racial tensions increased. Now, is that President Obama's fault? No. His presidency simply showed that we have not come as far as many of us would like to think and we need to take some major steps to improve inequality and racism.

Concerned citizen

We gave Obama almost a trillion dollars for "shovel ready jobs" putting people to work cleaning up poor ghettos and infrastructure. Instead he used the money to bail out Wall Street donors and political allies. Those actions proved he could really care less about helping poor black people, other than getting their vote.

From Jan 1, 2009 to Dec. 31, 2012; over 16,000 blacks we're killed by black on black violence. How come he did nothing to stop it?

He could have been a leader and denounced criminal behavior, and violence related to police intervention in criminal acts, like many black leaders and preachers have done. No, he encouraged it instead. Not what a President or leader of any kind should do.

In his home town of Chicago (where many are still waiting for things he promised as a community organizer), on the night of the Charlottesville mess, 34 were shot and 6 murdered with almost no press coverage because it has become so routine. There's a news story of a young child murdered in an alley by a rival gang member as a notice to his father. Why aren't people marching and protesting the rising gang violence that has nothing to do with whites?

Not all the current problems can be blamed on Obama. However, he did fail to be a true leader as the first half-black President in the US.

Concerned citizen

I hit the wrong button before I could add I do not in any way support the white supremacists. I voted for Obama in 2008 but am saddened he did not live up to his campaign promises to the blacks.

sshrader

Now is the time to really look back at our history, to know how we got to where we are. Examine Chicago's housing history: the Great Migration, Chicago's Black Belt, restrictive lending practices, inequality of city services. There is no question that Chicago has been adversely affected by racist inequalities in its development, deep roots of social injustice that undoubtedly lead to many of the current issues. Even the underreporting of black violence and deaths have been common practice to keep surrounding whites happy. Could President Obama have done more, maybe. But we now have to look ahead, knowing the truth of the past, and see what we can do to start making a difference. It will take more than just one leader.

Ars Longa

Miami, FL-1980
Los Angelos, CA-1992
Cincinnati, OH-2002

Race relations have always been strained because of unequal application of the law. We just have more videotape to show it these days.

And in communities like Crown Heights, NY (1991), race relations between neighbors have always been simmering. In the post segregation, post racial era, we chose to believe that, because Jim Crow is dead, so too was racism. That was explosively
naive, and the sooner we wake up to that reality and deal with it, the better.

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